Feeling blue? The best British destinations for getting over a breakup

Wednesday 30 November 2016

There’s a time in your life to stroll through blooming gardens in the Cotswolds or watch the sunset from a white-sand beach in the Isles of Scilly—but it’s not when you’re going through a breakup. When your heart feels like it’s been split in two, there’s nothing worse than being surrounded by honeymooners while you snap pictures with a sad little Selfie Stick. But that doesn’t mean you should stay home and wallow! Traveling—especially solo—is a great way to release mood-boosting endorphins; the key is simply picking the right destination. Not sure where to go? Here are the best spots in Britain for traveling alone when you’re newly single.

Liverpool, England

If you’re looking to party the pain away, then this maritime metropolis bursting with live music and scantily-clad singles is the perfect place. Though some of the more popular clubs like Level and Garlands require paying a cover (generally no more than £20), you won’t be thinking about your former flame when you’re tearing it up on the dance floor with 2,000 new pals.

Anglesey, Wales


Photo credit: Gaia Adventures 
Breakups can make even the most level-headed person feel a bit unhinged. To keep your mind from racing, perform an activity that requires your complete focus—like spending the night on a portaledge 50 feet above the Azure Sea. Trust us, when you drift off to sleep under the starlit sky (following an adrenaline-charged day of rock climbing), you’ll be too mesmerized by the sound of the crashing waves to think about anything... except the steep trek down.

Somerset, England

Sometimes it helps to have a good cry. Although it can feel embarrassing to express emotion in public, it’s not unusual to see travelers overcome with emotion when walking up the concrete path of Glastonbury Tor. Though the history of the hill has long been debated (some believe the Holy Grail was buried there), visitors often report feeling more hopeful and positive after a stroll along its slopes.

Causeway Coast, Northern Ireland

Whoever coined the term “out of sight, out of mind,” clearly isn’t a fan of social media. Thanks to the wonderful world of Facebook, Instagram, and Snapchat, it’s never been easier to know what our friends and foes are doing, reading, liking, even eating, 24 hours a day. Although it may be tempting to cyber-stalk your ex, trust us, it’ll only make it that much harder to move on. Instead, set off on an adventure that requires you to be cell phone free—like a road trip along Northern Ireland’s Causeway Coastal Route. Not only is the 195-mile trek from Belfast to Londonderry crazy beautiful, but it’s also a great way to clear your head (bonus points if you rent a convertible).

Scottish Highlands, Scotland

Photo credit: Cairngorm Reindeer Centre 

Ever wondered why so many fancy rehabs keep horses on premise? Yes, they’re stunning to admire… but they’re also healing. For decades, psychologists have used animal therapy to treat everything from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder to Substance Abuse. And yes, even broken hearts. Instead of settling for a garden-variety horse, why not head to the Cairngorm Mountains and spend some quality time with a reindeer. Take guided trek through the Scottish countryside with an experienced reindeer herder (Best. Job. Ever.) and then swing by the center’s paddocks to see the gentle giants up close and feel their velvety noses nuzzle against your hands. Just be careful they don't bite your fingers! 

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