Lonely Planet Unveils the UK’s Top Unmissable Experiences!

On Tuesday 13 August, Lonely Planet unveiled their first ultimate Ultimate UK Travelist, revealing the top 500 unmissable attractions across Britain, Northern Ireland and the Channel Islands.

Compiling the most exciting, unique and memorable experiences, the list reveals all that is great about Britain – with the world-renowned Edinburgh Festival topping the list!

With icons like the British Museum in London, Stonehenge in south-west England, and the Giant’s Causeway in Northern Ireland all featuring in the Top 10 Experiences, the country’s icons are well and truly represented. But the list is also jam-packed with lesser-known but no less impressive highlights – from hobnobbing with royalty in Glamis Castle’s rose-tinted turrets to wild swimming in Durdle Door.

Compiled from the Lonely Planet roundup, we’ve selected 21 of the most unusual, surprising and unforgettable activities, sights and landmarks – for a truly unmissable British experience.

Yorkshire Dales Adventure, Yorkshire (number 18)

Coming in at number 18 on the Lonely Planet list, the Yorkshire Dales are a fairy-tale landscape of heather moorland and rolling green valleys. Home to some of Britain’s finest karst limestone scenery, the Dales also offer some of the country’s best hiking and cycling routes. And with hidden highlights including Forbidden Corner - a labyrinthine walled garden, and Hardraw Force - England’s highest unbroken waterfall, to explore, it’s the ideal spot for travellers looking to discover the lesser-known side of Yorkshire.

Wild Swimming at Durdle Door, Dorset (number 29)

Located in the turquoise waters of the Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site, the ancient Durdle Door archway is one of Britain’s most unforgettable destinations for wild swimming. Soak up the sunshine on the pristine golden sands before taking the plunge and swimming beneath the monumental limestone archway, which was carved by the waves over centuries. Ranking at number 29, Durdle Door is an experience that testifies to the power of nature and the forces that shaped one of Britain’s most spectacular coastlines.

Hike the South West Coast Path, South-West England (number 37)

Combining the highlights of the Devon, Cornish, Somerset and Dorset coastlines, the South West Coast Path is 628 miles of staggering British beauty. Requiring around six weeks to complete in full, the path takes in sunlit beaches, picturesque fishing villages and major highlights including Tintagel Castle, the birthplace of King Arthur. With terrain ranging from easy to challenging, there’s something for every walking enthusiast looking to explore the delights of the south west.

Wild camping on Dartmoor, Devon (number 56)

Wild ponies, mist-covered moors and crystal-clear rivers await on a wild camping trip to Dartmoor. Get back to nature and sleep under the stars on a camping experience that reveals the rugged beauty of one of England’s largest open moorlands, all while discovering its staggering history at landmarks including Spinster’s Rock, which dates back to 4,000BC.

Island hop Scotland’s Western Seaboard, Scotland (number 58)

From exploring the only island country park in Britain to sipping the rich peaty whisky produced by Bowmore, the oldest distillery in Scotland, island hopping across the western seaboard reveals Scotland’s traditions and landscapes in all their glory. Discover Duart Castle, home of the Clan Maclean, and Iona Abbey, the ancient burial site of Scottish Kings, and spot magnificent red deer on the island of Jura. From wildlife to whisky, Scotland’s western islands have it all.

Deer Spotting Safari, Exmoor (number 61)

Get up-close-and-personal with Britain’s native wildlife on a deer spotting safari in Exmoor National Park. A former royal forest, the park is home to around 3,000 red deer – the largest wild land animals in England! Spot knobbly-kneed calves in spring and summer or see majestic stags battle it out in the search for a mate under a canopy of autumn leaves. With Exmoor ponies and a staggering array of flora and fauna to discover, it’s no surprise this experience ranks at an impressive number 61 on the list.

Coast to Coast Path, Northern England (number 76)

One of Britain’s most popular routes for walkers, the Coast to Coast Path comes in at number 76. Designed by renowned author and fellwanderer Alfred Wainwright, the path encompasses 190 miles of northern England’s most impressive landscapes. Covering three of our finest National Parks - the Lake District, the Yorkshire Dales and the North York Moors – and roaming across terrain that ranges from flower strewn dales to mountainous peaks, the path is perfect for cyclists and walkers looking to discover Britain in all its diverse glory.

Banksy Trail, Bristol (number 85)

Follow the trail of Banksy, one of Britain’s best known street artists in his birthplace, Bristol! One of the country’s lesser-known urban delights, the city is awash with quirky culture, cool boutiques and an eclectic dining scene, in addition to a wide array of impressive street art. With a range of street arts tours on offer, visitors will discover the impact that Banksy has had on pop culture and the art scene, and can even try their hand at creating their own graffiti.

Dungeness Train, Kent (number 110)

Jump aboard the Romney, Hythe & Dymchurch Railway steam train and step back in time on a journey to Dungeness. Best known for the historic battle of 1652, Dungeness is now classified as Britain’s only desert. Home to a fascinating array of plant, bird and sea life, this Site of Special Scientific Interest is well worth discovering. See the traditional cottages of local fishermen and find out more about their lives, before climbing the historic lighthouse for incredible views of the English Channel towards France.

Victorian Tunnel Tour, Newcastle (number 167)

Step back in time on a tour of Newcastle’s secret Victoria Tunnel. Originally constructed in 1842 to transport coal below the city streets, the tunnel was used as an air raid shelter during World War II and is rich in history. Experience an air raid re-enactment and walk beneath the city’s major landmarks, including Hadrian’s Wall, before hearing tales of the resident ghost and the city’s Victorian past.

Spot Puffins and Seals on Rathlin Island, Northern Ireland (number 194)

Wildlife lovers and photography enthusiasts should make a beeline for the rugged cliffs of Rathlin Island. Managed in part by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, the island is particularly appealing during the birds’ nesting season. Head to the West Light Viewpoint to spot baby puffins and their parents cavorting through the undergrowth in spring and summer, see native species including kittiwakes and guillemots, and make sure to look out for basking seals, porpoises and even dolphins!

Channel Your Inner Braveheart at Stirling Castle, Scotland (number 217)

Trace the footsteps of Scottish hero William Wallace and discover his true history on a visit to Stirling Castle, the setting of the 1995 epic Braveheart. Scale the 246 steps to the William Wallace Monument and enjoy staggering views of the surrounding countryside. Explore the Royal Palace, the Great Hall and Queen Anne Gardens, hear tales of legendary combats including the Battle of Bannockburn, and learn the story of King Robert the Bruce – a Scottish National Hero.

Ride Some of Wales’ Wildest Waves Along Hell’s Mouth Beach, Wales (number 232)

Surfing enthusiasts can ride some of Britain’s best waves at Hell’s Mouth Beach in Gwynedd. Home to the Wakeboard Festival in July, the beach offers four miles of sandy shores, perfect azure water and even the chance to spot harbour porpoises and bottlenose dolphins. With a current that’s gentle enough for swimmers looking to relax in the waves, but strong enough to guarantee some perfect waves, the beach is one of the area’s best kept secrets for lovers of water sports.

Branch Out at the National Botanic Garden of Wales, South Wales (number 261)

Featuring the world’s largest single-span glasshouse, a national nature reserve, and a variety of beautiful and innovative themed gardens, the National Botanic Garden of Wales has something for every green-fingered enthusiast. Discover the medicinal secrets of local herbs at the Apothecary’s Garden, meet native species at the British Bird of Prey Centre, or enjoy an ever-changing range of flora-themed events throughout the year.

World Conker Champs, Northamptonshire (number 317)

We Brits love a quirky festival, and at number 317 the World Conker Championships fits the bill perfectly! Played using the seeds of horse chestnut trees, the championship sees competitors smash their way to victory in the picturesque Northamptonshire village of Southwick. Hosted by the Ashton Conker Club, the competition has taken place since 1965 and involves players using a conker, threaded with a piece of string, to break their opponent’s conker. Competitors take it in turns to strike their opponent’s piece, with the winner owning the conker that does not break.

Whizz Through the Zip World Slate Caverns in Blaneu Ffestiniog, Wales (number 327)

Zip World, near the historic mining town of Blaenau Ffestiniog, offer guests the chance to climb through a unique underground course in a disused slate mine or zip down Europe’s largest zip wire! Surrounded by stunning Welsh scenery, it’s an unbeatable place to bounce and slide through a huge underground adventure, for an action-packed experience to remember.

Margate Shell Grotto, Margate (number 339)

An ancient temple, a pagan place of worship, or even the residence of a cult – nearly 200 years after it was discovered, the debate still rages as to the origins of the Margate Shell Grotto! Nicknamed Shellhenge and decorated with an incredible 4.6 million shells, the grotto is a unique work of art that has to be seen to be believed. Join the debate and wander along 70ft of chalk tunnels to discover the 2,000sq foot mosaic, which features oysters, ancient gods and even the tree of life among its swirling, intricate patterns.

Learn to Cook at River Cottage, Devon (number 392)

Founded by British celebrity chef, Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, the chance to cook at the renowned River Cottage comes in as a foodie favourite at number 392. With a wide range of courses including gluten-free Christmas cooking, easy cheese making and meat curing and smoking, visitors will have the chance to discover the secrets of the acclaimed TV series, savour local produce and learn how to create truly scrumptious British recipes.

Star Spot on Lundy Island, South-West England (number 452)

A designated Dark Sky Discovery Site, Lundy Island has no street lighting or electricity after midnight, making it a stargazing spot that’s out of this world! At night, budding astronomers can expect to spot the Milky Way, distant galaxies and meteor showers, while its incredibly diverse flora and fauna, including basking sharks, dolphins and puffins, make it a nature lover’s paradise.

Hobnob with Royalty in Glamis Castle’s Rose-Tinted Turrets, Scotland (number 468)

One of the lesser-known royal residences, this fairy-tale castle inspired Shakespeare’s Macbeth and was the childhood home to HRH The Queen Mother. Visitors can explore the birthplace of HRH Princess Margaret, discover the sprawling gardens and admire the rose-tinted turrets. Alternatively, take a guided tour and learn the secrets of the Earls of Strathmore and Kinghorne, who have resided here since 1372.

Learn to Churn at Wensleydale Creamery, Yorkshire (number 496)

The British love affair with all things cheese-related is long established. Now, visitors can get in on the act and learn to churn beautifully British cheese at Wensleydale Creamery, one of Yorkshire’s best known producers. With cheese and butter-making demonstrations held throughout the day, plus cookery demonstrations of popular local dishes including Wensleydale Chicken and Yorkshire Rarebit, the creamery is a tasty experience for food fans on a trip to Britain.

10 fantastiske ting at tage sig til i York

Den smukke muromgærdede by York har 2000 års historie og kulturarv, og har et utroligt udvalg af ting at lave og se især for historieinteresserede. Fra sin uundgåelige gotiske katedral til labyrinten af middelalderlige gader har vi formået at reducere listen til blot 10 ting. Hvis du planlægger at tilbringe et par dage, anbefaler vi et York Pass, som sparer dig penge ved adgang til mange af byens attraktioner.

 1.  Se York med gargoyle’s-eye 

 

Over Yorks labyrint af gamle gader troner de tre muskulære tårne på ​​i York Minster, den største gotiske bygning i Storbritannien. Katedralen, du ser i dag, blev påbegyndt i 1220, tog omkring 250 år at bygge og anses nu for en af ​​Europas fineste middelalderlige bygninger. Højdepunkter her inkluderer nogle af de ældste og smukkeste glasmosaikker i Storbritannien, (østvinduet er verdens største middelalderglasmosaik i et enkelt vindue) og krypten indeholder noget af den oprindelige kirke fra det 11. århundrede. Men det er den heftige 275-trins vandretur til toppen af ​​Central Tower, der er den rigtige showstopper her. Få vejret og se i gargoyle-perspektiv ud over Yorkshire, der er spredt ud nedenfor lige som så mange andre forpustede besøgende har gjort det i de sidste 600 år.

2.  Tag tilbage i tiden til et victoriansk fængsel

Hvis du nogensinde har spekuleret på, hvordan livet kunne have været for 200 år siden, kan York Castle Museum kaste lidt lys over den sag. Oplev seværdigheder og lyde fra det 18. århundredes York på en vidunderligt rekreativ victoriansk gade, før du udforsker museets andre historiske udstillinger, der dækker emner fra 1. verdenskrig til 1960'ernes popkultur. Museet har til huse i et tidligere fængsel, men navnet stammer fra, at huset står på stedet for et slot bygget af William Erobreren. Museet, der er beliggende i det centrale York, har gratis entre med et York Pass.

​3.  Tag på trainspotting

Den fantastiske størrelse, de glatte linjer og den dampdrevne tiltrækningskraft fra de lokomotiver, der befinder dig på National Railway Museum, er nok til at gøre selv den mest rolige til en ivrig trainspotter. De store skatte i de rummelige haller omfatter det eneste Bullet Train uden for Japan, Queen Victoria's 'Palace on wheels' og det smukke Duchess of Hamilton, der er en art deco-triumf i design og teknik. Åben hver dag, og gratis entre.

4. Besøg et af verdens største palæer

Med en Lonely Planet-titel som et af ​​verdens ti største palæer og fantastiske huse er Castle Howard absolut en kort bustur fra York City værd. Som en passende kulisse fra et drama, har det storslåede palæ fra det 18. århundrede, omgivet af frodige haver og bølgende bakker, været baggrunden for mange film- og tv-produktioner. Der er meget at udforske her med stedet feterede skuespilsfortid. Når man har ladet sig forbløffe af det dramatiske interiør og den verdensberømte kunstsamling, kan man gå en tur i det store parkområde med søer og templer, og tage sig tid til te og kage i den hyggelige café. Entreen er gratis med et York Pass

5. Se, hør og lugt en vikingelandsby

Tag en rejse tilbage gennem tiden til de dage, hvor de vilde fra Nord havde koloniseret York i det 10. århundred. Se, hør og lugt sågar en vikingelandsby komplet med smed, opholdsrum og et historisk nøjagtigt vikingetoilet. Jorvik Viking Centre er en fin blanding af historie og morskab, der bringer nogle af de forbavsende velbevarede genstande, der er udgravet under byen, til livet. Hvis du har lyst til en mere praktisk tilgang til historien, må du ikke gå glip af DIG, en attraktion der giver dig mulighed for at lege arkæolog.

BEMÆRK: JORVIK VIKING CENTER ER MIDLERTIDIGT LUKKET GRUNDET OVERSVØMMELSE. VI HENVISER TIL HJEMMESIDEN FOR YDERLIGERE OPLYSNINGER.

6. Nyd en traditionel eftermiddagste

 

Du har været oppe i det midterste tårn i York Minster, du har ladet dig bjergtage af dampbæsterne+ på National Railway Museum, og du har muligvis endda set et ægte vikingetoilet. Nu har du vist fortjent en kop te. Og stedet til det skal være Betty' Tea Rooms, , i Yorkshire, der serverer lækkert bagværk, kager og opfriskende te i de same smukke omgivelser, som siden 1930'erne. Stedet er udsmykket af de samme håndværkere, der klargjorde Queen Mary Ocean Liner. Du må bestemt ikke gå glip af en kop te i disse omgivelser.

7. Smag dig gennem chokoladens historie

 

En af Yorks nyere attraktioner er også den sødeste. Der er blevet fremstillet chokolade i byen i 300 år, og York var engang hjemsted for 2 af verdens store chokolademærker - Rowntree's og Terrys. Ikoniske chokolader fra Aero til Smarties og den mægtige Kit Kat begyndte livet her, så det er et godt sted at lære om chokoladefremstillingsprocessen fra bønne til bar. PåChocolate – York's Sweet Story smager du dig gennem chokoladehistorien, opdager generationer af konfekturehemmeligheder og afslutter din tur i Chocolate Bar for at nyde ekstravagancer som All Day Chocolate Breakfast og Ultimate Chocolate Fondue.

8. Tag en slentretur på Shambles

 

Beliggende i hjertet af de slidte, gamle, snoede veje erThe Shambles, der er en af ​​de bedst bevarede middelalderlige gader i Europa. Dens oprindelse er så gammel, at den engang blev nævnt i Dommedagsbogen, mens de overhængende tømmerindrammede huse, der stadig står i dag, er en bemærkelsesværdig påmindelse om byens fortid. Nu er de maleriske bygninger fyldt med hyggelige caféer og butikker, der sælger alt fra slik til håndlavet sæbe.

9. Hør skrækindjagende historier om York i romertiden

Er du til gode gys? I York Dungeon kan du forvente at spjætte af frygt, der ændres til latter, når du hører skræmmende historier om byens grusomme fortid. Med Yorks historie om vikingeangreb, hekse og pest, er der mange gyselige historier at fortælle, og du vil møde nogle af områdets mest tølperagtige karakterer, i takt med at du føres igennem en række scener i det spændende liveshow.

10. Gå på Englands bedst bevarede middelaldermur

York er beliggende i det nordlige England i Yorkshire. Det er cirka 2 timer med tog fra London eller kun 1 time og 15 minutter fra Manchester. Få mere at vide om byen York.

Sådan kommer du hertil

York er beliggende i det nordlige England i Yorkshire. Det er cirka 2 timer med tog fra London eller kun 1 time og 15 minutter Manchester. Få mere at vide om byen York

10 fantastiske ting at tage sig til i York

The Best Fringe Festivals in 2019

Whether it’s a celebration of live theatre, dance, arts or comedy, fringe festivals can be found in nearly every corner of Britain. Laugh along with the nation’s finest comedians as they prepare for their major tours, take in the sounds of up-and-coming musicians and discover new takes on some of the finest theatrical works. Packed with live entertainment and clever improvisation, these are the best Fringe Festivals to enjoy in 2019.

Maidstone Fringe

Marking the diversity of new and original music in Kent and the South East of England, Maidstone Fringe returns for a 9th year in 2019. Spread across numerous venues in the town centre, including pubs, clubs and music venues, as well as in cafes and coffee shops, the majority of the musical performances are free to attend. Expect a wide array of music too, with everything from rock, indie and pop-punk to blues, acoustic, folk, dance and hip-hop on the bill for 2019.

When? 1-6 May

Brighton Fringe

England’s largest arts festival, featuring more than 4,500 performances and events, takes place across Brighton, embracing all forms of art and artistic impression. Running alongside the Brighton Festival, the Brighton Fringe includes cabaret, classical concerts, club nights, comedy, theatre shows and a host of exhibitions, as well as street performances and exciting pop-up venues. In 2019, the International Seasons programme is also set to welcome some of the best contemporary performances by artists from France, the Netherlands, Finland, Australia, Iceland, Korea and Sweden, among others, showcasing the event’s global appeal.

When? 3 May – 2 June

Bath Fringe

Incorporating 3 weekends and the weeks in between, the Bath Fringe is a celebration of all the arts, meaning there are few rules regarding what is on. Both the people of Bath and venues in the city have a big say over what is included, with a detailed events list usually published in April.

When? 24 May - 9 June

Plymouth Fringe

An annual celebration of theatre and live performance, Plymouth Fringe welcomes some of the best talent in the South West, as well as others from across Britain. With venues in the city centre and on the waterfront, expect a host of inspiring performances as the Fringe marks its 5th consecutive year.

When? 27 May – 1 June

Ludlow Fringe

Ludlow Fringe is an independent arts, community and culture festival with a focus on inclusivity. Many of its events are free to attend, while prices are capped at £15 on those that are not, to ensure that events are affordable and accessible. Be sure to check out the Annual Ludlow Fringe Art Trail too, a diverse collection of affordable art by local and national artists that is showcased in 25 different pop-up venues and galleries. Featuring paintings, sculpture, photography, textiles, print and jewellery, and much more besides, the quirky venues are all located a short distance from the town centre.

When? 15-30 June

Guildford Fringe

Now in its 7th year, the Guildford Fringe is a multi-arts festival that features comedy, poetry, theatre, music, visual arts, workshops, burlesque and an abundance of family-friendly shows. Gag House Comedy Superstars kicks-off proceedings on 28 June, featuring comedian and actor Hal Cruttenden, Paul Sinha from TV’s The Chase and Susan Murray. Around 125 events made up the 2018 Guildford Fringe, and its organisers are expecting even more for 2019.

When? 28 June – 28 July

Greater Manchester Fringe

A multi-venue arts festival packed with comedy stand up, dance, magic shows, orchestras, new writing and a wealth of other art forms, the Greater Manchester Fringe provides a stage for performers to showcase their skills. It often acts as a platform for productions too - many past shows have moved onto the region’s established theatres including the Lowry Theatre, the Royal Exchange and the Bolton Octagon, or have embarked on nationwide tours. Now in its 8th year, a full programme of events for 2019 will be released at the start of May.

When 1-31 July

The Great Yorkshire Fringe

As part of its 5th anniversary celebrations, the Great Yorkshire Fringe is set to expand across York in 2019 to feature even more cultural venues. The historic city’s well-known thoroughfare, Parliament Street, will be transformed into an exciting festival hub offering everything from comedy and cabaret to music, theatre and fun for all the family. Performances from comedian Henning Wehn and writer, broadcaster and actor Gyles Brandreth already feature on the bill for 2019, as well as Austentatious: The Improvised Jane Austen Novel, an entirely improvised performance showcasing Jane Austen’s work in a new light.

When? 18-28 July (20 July, Austentatious: The Improvised Jane Austen Novel; 21 July, Gyles Brandreth; 27 July, Henning Wehn)

Llangollen Fringe

Final details for the 2019 Llangollen Fringe are yet to be announced, but the celebration of music, dance, film and art will return to the small town of Llangollen, in North Wales, this year. With an eclectic mix of musical and artistic talents on its bill each year, the festival is town centre based, providing easy access to pubs, restaurants and car parks. Taking centre stage is the Victorian Llangollen Town Hall, which boasts its own 300-seat capacity theatre.

When? 19-28 July

Reading Fringe

Designed to support emerging artists and to provide a platform for them ahead of the world famous Edinburgh Fringe, the Reading Fringe welcomes acts to the town from all over the globe. With venues spread across the town, the theme for 2019 is ‘Into the woods – and beyond’, an exploration of what it means to be part of an ecosystem and a consideration of what the future holds for Earth.

When? 20-28 July

Ventnor Fringe

A multi-award winning arts festival on the Isle of Wight, the Ventnor Fringe includes an array of exciting venues in the eclectic hillside town. Alongside cabaret, music, theatre and art, visitors can also expect to see pop-up cinemas, basement bars and mystery tours.

When? 23-28 July

Camden Fringe

From its origins in 2006 as an alternative to the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, the Camden Fringe provides performers with a chance to try out new and untested material. Encompassing all forms of performing arts, the Fringe welcomes both ambitious newcomers and experienced performers as they deliver new writing, sketch comedy, poetry, improvisation and everything in between. A full programme of events is expected in spring 2019.

When? 29 July – 25 August

Edinburgh Fringe

Renowned around the globe as being a platform for creative freedom, the Edinburgh Fringe Festival is the single biggest celebration of arts and culture in the world. Welcoming the finest performers to the Scottish capital, from the biggest names in show business to emerging stars, and covering all sorts of art forms, the festival features more than 50,000 performances each year. More than 300 venues provide the stages, alongside street events and market stalls, showcasing theatre, dance, comedy, cabaret, children’s shows, musicals, opera, exhibitions and speech – if it’s a form of art, it’s probably on the bill somewhere.

When? 2-26 August

Road trip – England’s North West

As the autumn months roll round, thoughts turn to brisk walks in a countryside ablaze with colour, cosy dinners by log fires and exploring cities as they gear up for the festive season. And what’s a great way to experience all of this on one trip? Take to the road! It’s easy to travel by car around regions of Britain, as short journey times between urban and rural landscapes mean packing in a huge amount within a few days. Here we look at travelling through England’s north-west region, driving from the vibrant city of Manchester, through the spectacular landscapes of the Lake District and Yorkshire Dales National Parks and culminating at the historic city of Carlisle.

Journey length: 120 miles

DAY ONE

Take time to explore Manchester before you head out on the road. Love football? This is the home of two of the world’s most famous football teams; Manchester United and Manchester City. Book a tour at their stadiums and then head to the National Football Museum to learn more about the history of the beautiful game. Manchester is also a renowned cultural hotspot; head to its Northern Quarter, the city’s creative hub, to spot awesome murals and visit independent boutiques, bars and restaurants. Into museums and art galleries? Check out the city’s Whitworth Art Gallery and The Lowry as well as the Imperial War Museum North and HOME, a purpose-built centre for international contemporary art, film and theatre.

Visit before the end of 2018 for: the Manchester Literature Festival in October and the Manchester Animation Festival in November.

Drive 45 minutes from Manchester to…Samlesbury Hall

You’re now in the gorgeous Lancashire countryside, home to one of the county’s most beautiful stately homes; Samlesbury Hall, a half-timbered black and white medieval house. Discover centuries of history as you explore the Victorian kitchen and schoolroom and take time to enjoy the autumnal colours in its stunning grounds.

Visit before the end of 2018 for: Spooky tours led by characters such as Witch Janey and ghost-storytellers, throughout October and November.

Drive 30 minutes from Samlesbury Hall to the conservation village of Downham

Downham is one of the north-west’s most picturesque villages and sits in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Its main charm is the gorgeous views from the village, unencumbered by apparent signs of modern life (satellite dishes, overhead wires, road signs). Downham has regularly featured as a filming location for period pieces.

Stay: At the Grade II-listed Assheton Arms gastro pub with rooms. Tuck into hearty meals created from local ingredients in its restaurant, complete with log fire.

DAY TWO

Drive 45 minutes from Downham to Haworth

You’ve crossed over from Lancashire into England’s largest county, Yorkshire, where you’ll be captivated by views that inspired literary classics Wuthering Heights and Jane Eyre. Head to the attractive village of Haworth, home to the world-famous Bronte Parsonage Museum, which gives a fascinating insight into the lives of Charlotte, Emily and Anne Bronte.

Visit before the end of 2018 for: a true taste of English eccentricity. In November, to mark the start of the festive season, Haworth hosts the quirky Pipes, Bows and Bells Weekend and Scroggling the Holly Weekend.

Drive an hour from Haworth to the village of Malham in the Yorkshire Dales National Park.

A pretty village that’s worth exploring, Malham is also a short walk from the incredible Malham Cove, once a glacier and now a gigantic rock amphitheatre with 80-metre high cliffs. Hike up the steps at this natural beauty spot and be rewarded with phenomenal views.

Stay: 30 minutes from Malham is the village of Austwick, home to The Traddock country house hotel, which dates to the 18th century and offers amazing views of the Yorkshire Dales National Park.

DAY THREE

Drive 45 minutes from Austwick to the city of Lancaster.

You’re driving back into the county of Lancashire and heading to the heritage city of Lancaster. Explore the 1,000-year-old Lancaster Castle, the city’s secret alleyways, historic pubs and Georgian architecture before a spot of shopping in its quirky boutiques and independent art galleries. While you’re in town, journey across the Trail of the Pendle Witches, a driving trail of 45 miles that the  infamous Pendle Witches travelled from as they headed to Lancaster Castle to stand trial in the early 17th century.

Visit Lancaster before the end of 2018 for: Lancaster Live, a three-day music festival in October when the city comes alive with hundreds of musical performances.

Drive 45 minutes from Lancaster to Cartmel

In less than an hour’s drive from Lancaster you’re in the picturesque Lake District, where one of your first stops should be the ancient village of Cartmel. Not only is it famous for the 12th-century Cartmel Priory, but also for the delectable English sweet treat, sticky toffee pudding; pick up your own to take home at the Cartmel Village Shop.

Stay: Cartmel is also home to Michelin-star restaurant-with-rooms L’Enclume, where you’ll have an unforgettable meal created by chef Simon Rogan. Stay in one of its 16 bedrooms located in the village.

DAY FOUR

Drive 30 minutes from Cartmel to Bowness on Windermere

You’re now in the heart of the Lake District National Park at the towns of Windermere and Bowness and gorgeous lakes scenery. Catch those bright autumn colours from the water itself aboard Windermere Lake Cruises’ steamers. Children’s author and illustrator Beatrix Potter was one of the Lakes’ most famous residents and all ages can enjoy the World of Beatrix Potter Attraction.

Visit Bowness before the end of 2018 for: an exhibition by Turner Prize-winner Grayson Perry at f Or drive 20 minutes into Kendal for the Lakes International Comic Art Festival in October and Kendal Mountain Festival in November.

Drive 45 minutes from Bowness-on-Windermere to Keswick

A lovely market town, Keswick is close to the lakes of Ullswater, Derwentwater and Bassenthwaite; catch the beautiful autumn colours from the lake on board Ullswater Steamers. Or, if you’re looking for an adrenaline rush, check out Honister, an innovative adventure attraction (also England’s last working slate mine). Climb the original miners’ route (the Via Ferrata Classic) an exposed adventure climbing course 1,200 feet/366 metres above the valley floor or take the bigger challenge by climbing the Via Ferrata Extreme!

Stay: Ten minutes from the centre of Keswick is Whinlatter, England’s only mountain forest and home to the Cottage in the Wood, a beautifully restored 17th-century restaurant-with-rooms.

DAY FIVE

Travel 45 minutes from Keswick to Carlisle

Known as the ‘Border City’, for its location just 15 minutes from England’s border with Scotland, Carlisle is a bustling city with a legendary history. Dating back to the Romans, who settled here to serve the forts of Hadrian’s Wall (just a 30-minute drive away), the city is home to artefacts of their occupation and influence, which can be seen at the Tullie House Museum & Art Gallery. And, for nine centuries, the medieval fortress Carlisle Castle has stood majestically overlooking the city; visit for a glimpse into medieval life and the castle’s turbulent past.

Visit before the end of 2018 for: the Carlisle Fireshow in November, one the largest of its kind in the north of England.

Five reasons to visit Britain’s National Parks

July heralds Britain’s National Parks Week (22-29), where an eclectic range of events, from seaside safaris, forest walks, family fun days and treasure trails, take place across our 15 National Parks. All boast diverse and ancient landscapes, communities with rich cultural roots going back thousands of years and are must-visit destinations of natural beauty and tranquillity. Each is unique and special in its own way; here’s why a visit to Britain’s National Parks should be on your itinerary.

 

Cool ways to explore the countryside

Outdoor pursuits are ubiquitous throughout the National Parks, with a huge variety to experience. Enjoy boating? Head to the Broads National Park, where pleasure boating, especially on board a barge, has been part of life through its myriad of inland waterways since the early 19th century. Looking for an activity to get that adrenaline pumping? The Lake District National Park boasts the highest concentration of outdoor activity centres in the UK – check out Honister, an innovative adventure attraction (and also England’s last working slate mine) for a brilliant buzz. Neighbouring Yorkshire Dales National Park is famed for its limestone geology, making it one of the best places in the UK for caving and potholing. And the only coastal national park, the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park in west Wales, is perfect for watersports from coasteering and surfing to sailing and kayaking. 

 

The chance to spot rare wildlife
Bring those binoculars…because the National Parks are home to rare and endangered species of wildlife. Scotland’s Cairngorms National Park – the largest of all the parks – is home to high plateaux with the rarest habitats and is the most southerly site in Europe for snow buntings. In fact, one in four of the UK’s endangered species have their home in this park, such as the golden eagle. Down on England’s east coast, in the Broads National Park, a quarter of Britain’s rarest species have their home here, while around 20 per cent of Wales’ Snowdonia National Park is specially designated by UK and European law to protect its distinctive wildlife. That includes the Snowdon Lily and the Snowdon beetle (both unique to Snowdon). And native wildlife often gives a National Park real character; check out the Dartmoor Ponies, a part of the Dartmoor National Park’s cultural heritage, and the iconic New Forest Ponies roaming free in the woods of the New Forest National Park.

 

Be inspired by contrasting landscapes
There are such varied landscapes within each National Park that depending on which area of each park you’re in you’ll find a wealth of distinctive environments. The Brecon Beacons National Park in south Wales, for example, is a mix of caves, gorges and waterfalls, hilltops, cliffs and broad valleys, as well as farmed landscapes, lakes and rivers. While down in the south-west of England, Exmoor National Park is one of heather and grass moors, wooded valleys, wonderful coastal views and upland farms. Exmoor is an International Dark Sky Park, as is Northumberland National Park in the north east of England; plus, the latter’s landscape is so geographically important, there are five Sites of Special Scientific Interest here, such as its volcanic and glacial features.

 

You’ll be stepping onto a film set
You might just recognise some of our National Parks’ landscapes and features from the silver screen, and from the pages of legendary novels and poems. The Peak District National Park in central England, for example, has been used many times as a film location, thanks to its multitude of magnificent stately homes – Chatsworth has starred in Pride & Prejudice, as has Lyme Hall; Haddon Hall was the background setting to Jane Eyre, Elizabeth and Moll Flanders while North Lees Hall, as well as appearing in Jane Eyre and Pride & Prejudice, starred in The Other Boleyn Girl. Elsewhere, Dartmoor’s landscape appeared in Steven Spielberg’s War Horse, while the Lake District is famously the inspiration for Romantic poets Wordsworth and Coleridge and children’s authors Beatrix Potter and Arthur Ransome.

 

Stay in unique accommodation
You’ll find everything from campsites to charming B&Bs, cosy inns and luxury hotels throughout National Parks, as well as accommodation that’s rather extraordinary. In Scotland’s Loch Lomond & Trossachs National Park wild camping is permitted in certain sections, an incredible way to experience the true beauty of the nature. Experience a glamping site with a difference at the North York Moors National Park at La Rosa campsite and stay in gypsy caravans with décor ranging from circus-themed, fairy tale themed, ‘psycho candy’ (all pink) and 1970s funky Africa! At the opposite end of Britain, on the edge of the beautiful South Downs National Park in south England – the country’s youngest national park – you can even stay on a 1964 Routemaster London double decker bus in Blackberry Wood, kitted out with sleeping, kitchen and dining areas!

 

Spotlight on: Peak District National Park

  • The Peak District was the first designated National Park in Britain, in 1951.
  • The park stretches into five counties: Derbyshire, Cheshire, Staffordshire, Yorkshire, Greater Manchester, meaning it’s accessible from the cities of Manchester, Sheffield, Derby and Nottingham.
  • With 1,600 miles of public rights of way across footpaths, bridleways and tracks, this is great walking country. Love cycling? Hit the park’s 65 miles of off-road dedicated cycling and walking trails, with cycle-hire centres at Ashbourne, Parsley Hay, Derwent Valley and Middleton Top. It also boasts a treasure trove of disused railways to explore – the park owns 34 miles of them at High Peak Trail, Tissington Trail and Monsal Trail.
  • Head to the medieval market town of Bakewell, home to one of the UK’s most important agricultural markets. Make sure you try its famous Bakewell puddings (flaky pastry base, moist almond and jam filling, said to be invented by lucky mistake by an 18th-century kitchen maid).
  • The National Park has 2,900 listed buildings, including the world-renowned stately homes of Chatsworth, the medieval Haddon Hall, the Norman Peveril Castle, Bakewell’s medieval bridge as well as centuries-old farm-buildings and cottages.
  • There are plenty of interesting villages to explore. Castleton is famous for its caverns, and the “shivering mountain” of Mam Tor, Winnats Pass and Peveril Castle. Then there’s Eyam (“plague village”), Hathersage (reputed grave-site of Robin Hood’s friend Little John), Tideswell (14th century “cathedral of the Peak”), Ilam (Swiss-style architecture), Ashford-in-the-Water (classic English riverside village), and Tissington (Tissington Hall and close to Tissington Trail).
  • The Peak District has a distinctive custom to look out for: well dressing! Originally a pagan ceremony to honour water gods, it’s now a summer tradition in dozens of villages. Different villages decorate their wells or springs with natural, ephemeral pictures made of flowers, petals, seeds, twigs, nuts and berries, pressed into soft clay held in wooden frames. Well dressing weeks also include carnivals and streets decorated with bunting.

48 Hours in… Leeds

One of the only cities outside London to have its own ballet and opera companies, Yorkshire city Leeds is a hotbed of cultural gems, a city with a rich industrial and sports heritage that has become an energetic, contemporary city with a flourishing food and drink scene. Home to its own international airport (Leeds/Bradford Airport) and just two hours by train from London and one hour from Manchester, spending a weekend in one of the north of England’s most exciting cities has never been easier.

 

TIME TO CHECK IN

Leeds has a wide range of hotels to suit all budgets yet if you’re looking for high-end accommodation, check out the only independently owned luxury hotel in central Leeds, Quebecs. This Grade-II listed, four-star property is situated in one of the city’s most impressive terracotta brickwork buildings, located in the attractive Victoria Quarter. Another luxury option is the city’s oldest hotel, The Cosmopolitan, which combines a historic setting with contemporary style. Leeds has some lovely boutique hotels too; in the heart of Leeds, the Malmaison is the place to go if you’re into cool, quirky interior designs while riverside hotel 42 The Calls, located in an 18th-century former flour mill, will soon be undergoing a multi-million pound investment under new management, set to develop it into five-star luxury accommodation.

 

DAY ONE

09:00 EMBARK ON A WALK OF DISCOVERY

It’s common knowledge that to really get to know a city you should walk it – and this is just as true of Leeds, where you can download self-guided walks around the city with a treasure hunt theme! Just over a mile each, Curious About Leeds has devised routes that take you from Leeds Art Gallery to the River Aire, and a second route from the river to Park Square. The beauty of these walks is that you’ll take in not just the city’s famous sights but also the more unusual ones. Expect to see the chic Victorian Arcades, Europe’s largest covered market – Kirkgate Market – former mills whose fortune the city was built on and secret squares to explore. Also look out for iconic street art; Leeds is home to the UK’s tallest mural, Athena Rising, as well as works such as Cornucopia next to the Corn Exchange and the George Street Mural at Kirkgate Market.

 

11:00 DELVE INTO THE CITY’S PAST

The story of Leeds unfolds at the Leeds City Museum, where – through six impressive galleries – you’ll find artefacts from archaeological finds to displays reflecting city life today. It’s also home to the Leeds Tiger… one of the most recognisable and loved exhibits at the museum with a fascinating back story to discover.

 

13:00 TAKE EARLY AFTERNOON TEA

It will be hard to tear yourself away from the pretty period furniture and mismatched crockery at vintage tearoom Just Grand! but try to as there’s plenty to tempt you on its menu. Located in the city’s Grand Arcade – a Grade II-listed Victorian shopping arcade that now boasts a good mix of independent retailers – you’ll reboot energy levels enjoying drinks from its huge assortment of loose-left teas (Yorkshire tea is, of course, on the menu!) and the delectable afternoon tea menu. Why choose a plain scone when you could choose from its wide range of flavoured scones such as black treacle and date, Earl Grey and Lemon, and ginger and apricot. Just Grand has also introduced a Gentleman’s Afternoon Tea – finger sandwiches, locally produced pork pie and crisps along with a choice of Yorkshire bottled beer.

 

15:00 EXPLORE CONTEMPORARY ART IN A HISTORIC BUILDING

One of Leeds’ leading centres for contemporary art is at The Tetley, housed in an Art Deco-style former brewery. It’s not just the collections inside that are worth exploring – the building itself is an Insta-favourite; founded in 1822 – Tetley is one of Leeds’ oldest (beer) brewing families – it’s of huge social and industrial significance to the city. As well as changing exhibitions there’s a rich programme of events to take part in, including art workshops.

 

17:00 ENJOY COCKTAILS AND PRE-THEATRE DINNER

A department store might not the first place you think of for cocktails and dinner, but when’s it’s The Fourth Floor brasserie and bar at the city’s branch of the high-end Harvey Nichols, you know you’re in store for a treat. Superb views of the city greet you as you enjoy cocktails in the glamorous bar – think gold dome lights and circular banquettes – and the menu in the brasserie focuses on using the best Yorkshire produce in its creative dishes. It’s perfect for a pre-theatre meal, with the dinner service starting from 4.30pm.

 

19:30 CATCH A SHOW

Take advantage of the fact that Leeds is the only city outside of London to have its own ballet and opera companies and book tickets for a performance by either Opera North, one of Europe’s leading arts organisations, which produces the classics as well as lesser-known works and musical theatre, or the Northern Ballet, where you’ll find original productions as well as new interpretations of classic ballets. 

 

DAY TWO

09:00 DISCOVER HISTORIC TREASURES

Ever fancied seeing a world record-breaking suit of elephant armour? Here’s your chance – at Leeds’ Royal Armouries Museum, which sits on the waterfront at the city’s docks. Five galleries hold more than 8,000 fascinating objects, including Henry VIII’s tournament armour, the five heroic swords based on the prop weapons used in movies Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit, and the incredible centrepiece of the whole museum, the Hall of Steel – the largest mass display of arms and armour created since the 19th century.

 

11:00 SET OFF ON A SPORTING JOURNEY

Yorkshire boasts a legendary cricket heritage and, for cricket fans around the world, the Yorkshire Cricket Museum is a must-visit. It’s here that you’ll discover artefacts from Yorkshire’s cricket legends, the bats and balls used by iconic players as well as multi-media interviews with cricket heroes.

OR

SET OFF ON A SHOPPING JOURNEY

A raft of unique independent retailers can be found under one stunning roof at the Grand Arcade, a shopping venue built in 1897 where its fine Victorian architecture – including an exquisite glass roof and beautiful arched windows – is just as much of a draw as the shops. It’s a lovely surrounding in which to explore the stores, which range from luxury menswear retailer Labels, My Vibrant Home for stylish handmade interiors goods, and The Handmade Collective, where you’ll find unique gifts created by 60 local Yorkshire design-makers to take home. You’ll also find a vibrant shopping district at Victoria Leeds, an eclectic shopping destination combining Victoria Quarter and Victoria Gate with traditional the British high-end department stores of Harvey Nichols and John Lewis and more than 90 boutiques.
 

13:00 VEG OUT FOR LUNCH 

Also finding its home in the Grand Arcade is Roots and Fruits, a fantastic vegetarian restaurant that’s recently upgraded its menu to be mainly plant-based. But there’s no compromise on flavour… this Leeds favourite is packed with local, seasonal produce and presents dishes such as Roots and Fruits Jerk Jackfruit with a secret recipe jerk marinade and giant Rainbow Salads.

 

15:00 LOSE YOURSELF IN A CHOCOLATE METROPOLIS

Leeds is home to the UK’s first two-storey chocolate emporium at Hotel Chocolat and it’s here you can learn the delicate art of chocolate-making at its Chocolate School, just one of the chocolate-filled experiences on offer here. Chocoholics may want to embark on its Tasting Adventure and there’s always further opportunity to taste the glorious sweetness in its Mega Café; look out, in particular, for its signature hot chocolate.

 

17:00 GO CUCKOO FOR CREATIVE COCKTAILS

Come to quirky bar Cuckoo for its imaginative cocktails, such as Peanut Butter Martinis and Dirty Grasshoppers, or to sample local craft beers served through ‘Giraffe Towers’, and stay for its amazingly fun décor. Murals, paint-splattered animal heads, cool neon lights and a secret rooftop garden all make a visit to this bar a colourful occasion.

 

20:00 TASTE THE CREATIVITY

Restaurant Man Behind the Curtain – with a name inspired by The Wizard of Oz – offers a magical culinary experience where you’ll be wowed by chef Michael O’Hare’s creativity. The restaurant’s tasting menu of 10 to 14 sequences’ includes hand-massaged octopus with capers and lemon; birds nest and kimchi ramen and cardamom & lemongrass soup with chilli sorbet- a treat for both the eyes and the taste-buds. Other high-end restaurants to have on your radar include Stockdales and Ox Club.

Alternatively, visit Bundobust for delicious Indian street food and craft beer that make this place one of Leeds go-to places for easy, deliciouscuisine. Still hungry? Try Matt Healy x The Foundry. This Leeds institution has recently relaunched with Yorkshire-born chef, Matt Healy (runner-up in BBC’s MasterChef: The Professionals series), at the helm. The interior and exterior was redesigned and rebranded as Matt Healy x The Foundry. In the kitchen, Matt is concentrating on a menu of simple British dishes using up to five ingredients. A sample menu may include baby chicken ‘kiev’, wild garlic and duck fat potato, or pollock, charred leeks and potatoes with romesco sauce. Watch this space as the restaurant is quickly becoming one of the hottest spots in Leeds.

 

22:00 Leeds’ nightlife rivals that of any major British city and it’s particularly good for quirky bars. For a slice of hipster heaven and craft beers head to the cool, vintage-style Outlaws Yacht Club; drink cocktails from teapots at the Alice in Wonderland-themed, eclectically decorated The White Rabbit; while the Belgrave Music Hall is where to go to enjoy craft beers and cask ales across three floors of a 1930s venue that comes with a fabulous roof terrace, live music events, film and comedy or art exhibitions. Beer is also big news in Leeds; why visit one brewery when you can visit four on the Leeds Brewery Tour, and, if you’re coming over in October, look out for details of the city’s Oktoberfest.

Foodie focus on… Yorkshire

You’ll often hear people hailing from England’s largest county, Yorkshire, in the north of the country, using the phrase ‘God’s own county’ to describe their home region and, given the sheer diversity and quality of the local produce, the award-winning restaurants, gastropubs and chef innovation found there, you’ll begin to understand why. Here are just a few of the reasons why foodies should put Yorkshire on their destination wish-lists.

 

Regional specialities and where to taste them

YORKSHIRE PUDDING: a pudding made of eggs, flour and milk and usually served with roast meat and gravy, although it can also be served with jam, syrup or custard as a dessert. The first recorded recipe for the accompanying Yorkshire pudding was in 1737 when it was called ‘A Dripping Pudding’, the dripping coming from spit-roast meat.

Where can I eat it? Pretty much with every Sunday roast dinner served the length and breadth of Britain (such is its popularity) but when in Yorkshire, why not go large? The Crooked Billet in Saxton, north Yorkshire, boasts a dedicated Yorkshire pudding menu! Yes, that’s three courses, each with its own take on the Yorkshire pudding. Award-winning pub The Strines Inn in Bradfield, half an hour’s drive from Sheffield also serves Yorkshire puddings of gigantic proportions.

 

WENSLEYDALE CHEESE: mild, clean, and slightly sweet, Wensleydale cheese has a subtle flavour, said to have notes of wild honey and a moist but crumbly texture. The Wensleydale Creamery is the only manufacturer of authentic Yorkshire Wensleydale.

Where can I eat it? You’ll find it across cheeseboards in Yorkshire (and beyond) but go straight to the source – the Calvert Restaurant at the Wensleydale Creamery has the Ultimate Yorkshire Wensleydale Cheese Experience; three courses all using their finest ingredient. Go along to explore the visitor centre, museum, shop and attend demonstrations and tastings.

 

PONTEFRACT CAKE: Not, in fact, cake, but liquorice! The Yorkshire city of Pontefract was the furthest north liquorice was ever grown to produce liquorice sweets and is recognised by its stamp of Pontefract Castle.

Where can I eat it? Buy it throughout Yorkshire; for a fun shopping experience, pick some up at the Oldest Sweet Shop in England in Pateley Bridge, near Harrogate in north Yorkshire, housed in a building dating back to 1661. You’ll also be tempted by the other sweets laid out in row upon row of traditional sweet jars – this has been a family run shop since 1827.

 

FAT RASCAL: similar to a scone or rock cake, Fat Rascals are plump and fruity and based on old regional speciality, turf cake.

Where can I eat it? This fruity bake is one of Betty’s Café Tea Rooms best-known and best-selling products, thanks to the personal touches the company made to the original recipe…so where better to eat one than there! There are six Betty’s establishments across Yorkshire – in Harrogate, York, Ilkley and Northallerton – and you can choose from the tea rooms’ original take on it, decorated with glacé cherries and almonds, or a smaller chocolate and orange variation. All are made by hand to exact Betty’s Fat Rascal specifications.

 

PARKIN: a gingerbread cake made with oatmeal and treacle that’s been eaten in Yorkshire since the early 18th century.  

Where can I eat it? Bakeries and cafés are the place to find parkin; try Lottie Shaw’s Bakery in Brighouse (less than half an hour from Leeds) – all parkin is hand-crafted on site and based on traditional family recipes past down to Lottie by her great grandmother.

 

FORCED RHUBARB: Yorkshire is home to the Rhubarb Triangle, a nine-square mile area between Wakefield, Morley and Rothwell in the west of the county, renowned for producing early forced rhubarb. The season for forced rhubarb is roughly from January to mid-March.

Where can I eat it? Celebrate this regional speciality in style at the annual Wakefield Festival of Food, Drink and Rhubarb! The next one takes place 22-24 February 2019 and you’ll find everything from rhubarb gifts, rhubarb-themed dishes and rhubarb trails. Wakefield is around 30 minutes from Leeds.

 

5 must-do food and drink experiences

Michelin-style cooking: The Cookery School, Swinton Park is perched on the edge of the stunning Yorkshire Dales National Park, surrounded by a 17th-century castle and parkland, and it’s here you can learn to create a traditional afternoon tea, take a beginners' baking class or spend a weekend cooking modern British cuisine with chef Kevin Hughes. You’ll use the seasonal ingredients from the hotel’s walled garden as well as venison, rabbit, game and trout from the wider Estate. Housed in the converted Georgian stable wing of four-star Swinton Park hotel, the school offers a range of hands-on two-day, one day and half-day cookery classes for adults, teenagers and children, aged six to nine.

Wine: While many vineyards are based in the south and east of England (the soil and climate make ideal vine-growing conditions), England’s most northerly vineyard is found in Yorkshire. The Ryedale Vineyard is located just a half-hour drive from the ancient city of York and offers bed and breakfast accommodation in its Grade II-listed farmhouse, which dates back to around 1630. The vineyard holds tours as well as pizza and wine evenings, where the pizza is cooked on its outdoor clay oven.

Whisky: Whisky? From Yorkshire? That’s correct – the Spirit of Yorkshire Distillery in Hunmanby, north of the county, is creating Yorkshire’s first single malt whisky. When the project was first conceived, the team brought in the late, respected whisky expert Dr Jim Swan as a consultant and now the whole process is overseen by the distillery team, from field-to-bottle; all the barley and spring water used is grown and sourced on its family farm. Join in the Distilling Experience, where you’ll get the lowdown on the distillery's ethos and process, as well as the chance to try some of its maturing Malt.

Artisan food: The town of Malton, half an hour’s drive from York, has been described as Yorkshire’s Food Capital – and it certainly lives up to that title thanks to its vast range of incredible local produce and restaurants; in fact, there’s a ‘Made in Malton’ brand, a group of artisan food and drink producers in the town. Many of these can be visited and the Malton Cookery School offers walking ‘artisan produce’ tours, taking in bakeries, breweries, pie shops and coffee roasteries. One new tour earmarked to launch later this year (9 November) is the ‘Malton Food Tour – Gin O’Clock, designed for people ‘with a sweet tooth who love their gin’. You’ll sample six different gins, a selection of Made in Malton producers and tour Malton’s new Gin Distillery.

Afternoon tea: Not just one afternoon tea to linger over (although you can book this option too), but a whole tour of them! Tours in a Dish take you on a 3.5-hour guided tour of York, to the best places for tea, to take part in a tea and cheese pairing workshop, and to visit three unique venues and two top tea retailers and importers.

 

Hot restaurants you have to visit

The Pipe and Glass Inn, Beverley

Set in a former coaching inn in the beautiful surroundings of the Dalton Estate, this elegant inn has retained its Michelin star (and other major foodie awards) for the last eight years. Owners James and Kate Mackenzie play a huge part in that, with James in the kitchen, Kate in front of house and the gorgeous gardens at the back (which grow produce for its menus) only add to the relaxed ambience. Food-wise, expect enticing meals such as barbequed rump of Yorkshire lamb with barley, beer and broad bean risotto and sweet treats such as ginger burnt cream, poached garden rhubarb and East Yorkshire sugar cakes.

The Black Swan, Oldstead

It may be situated in a small village 45 minutes’ drive from York, but it’s this restaurant with rooms TripAdvisor users voted as the world’s best in 2017. A well-deserved accolade thanks to its Michelin star and its one creative menu – the Tasting Menu – that’s been inspired by local ingredients the restaurant either forages for or grows itself; think langoustine with salted strawberry or raw deer with wild garlic. The Black Swan is also making a name for itself with its experimental drinks menu; its ‘Oldstead cocktails’ menu comprises beautifully named concoctions such as Rubus Fruiticolitan and Forced Fizz (made with rhubarb schnapps).

Rafters, Sheffield

This Michelin-listed/2 AA Rosettes eaterie offers three alternative menus; a classic menu, offering three courses, its Experience One – the Classic menu but enhanced further – and Experience Two, its unique tasting menu (with vegetarian options for each). For the latter, a sample menu may include BBQ line-caught mackerel, Cornish turbot or fresh curd agnolotti, all served in a stylish and comfortable city restaurant.

Skosh, York

Recently opened, Skosh is a cosy, casual, small plates restaurant that’s fast making a name for itself in the historic city, thanks to the creativity of chef Neil Bentinck, who’s worked at several Yorkshire’s best restaurants and brings the influences of his Asia travels to his dishes. You can watch the innovation at play – described as ‘British cooking with an international influence’ – with a seat overlooking the open kitchen. Try small plates of cod’s roe eclairs or crispy guinea hen wontons or larger plates such as whole roast Norfolk quail with spiced lentils.

Magpie Café, Whitby

Whitby in north Yorkshire has some of the best fish and chips in Britain – light, crispy and served piping hot from the deep fat fryer. The Magpie Café, close to the harbour in Whitby, a 90-minute drive from the city of York, is known throughout Yorkshire for its tasty fish and chips and seafood chowder; the long queues outside is testament to its popularity. Monster-size haddock comes from its own fishmongers, which also supplies fish to the locals of Whitby.

Yorke Arms, Nidderdale

Surrounded by the tranquil rolling countryside of the Yorkshire Dales, the Yorke Arms is a former 18th-century coaching inn that has been carefully converted into a Michelin-starred restaurant, with a clutch of sumptuously comfortable bedrooms. Co-owned and run by Michelin-starred chef Frances Atkins, the restaurant serves up the best of Yorkshire produce, from Whitby crab to Wensleydale soufflé and local beef. The whole building has recently reopened following refurbishment, with its accompanying bedrooms and suites due to reopen this summer.

Matt Healy x The Foundry, Leeds

This Leeds institution has recently been relaunched, with Yorkshire-born chef, Matt Healy (runner-up in BBC’s MasterChef: The Professionals series) at the helm, with the interiors and exteriors redesigned and rebranded as Matt Healy x The Foundry. He’s concentrating on a menu of simple British dishes that may only have up to five ingredients; a sample menu may include baby chicken ‘kiev’, wild garlic and duck fat potato or pollock, charred leeks and potatoes with Romesco sauce. It’s fast becoming one of the hottest restaurants in Leeds.

The Angel Inn, Hetton

A country pub and restaurant with rooms that’s won just about every regional and national foodie award going, the Angel Inn also has the fortune of being surrounded by acres of countryside in the Yorkshire Dales National Park, around a 45-minute drive from Harrogate. The food is a quirky blend of “modern British with French Yorkshire nuances”, which translates local ingredients into delightful morsels like courgette and beetroot meringue pie and its famous feuille de brick parcel of fish on lobster sauce.

 

Yorkshire’s Insta-worthy food

The YorkyPud™: Created by the York Roast Co, which has two locations in historic York, this is a contemporary twist on a Yorkshire classic.

Bundobust: Delicious Indian street food and craft beers make this one of Leeds’ go-to places for easy, tasty cuisine.

The Man Behind The Curtain: This Leeds-based restaurant is a culinary eye-opener; its Permanent collection is served as a set tasting menu of between 10 and 14 courses – presenting plenty of Instagram opportunities.

York Chocolate Story: Unwrap the history of the families who made Yorkshire one of the greatest exporters of chocolate, and then enjoy its very pretty and delicious Chocolate Afternoon Tea.

 

A 48-hour foodie itinerary

The whole of Yorkshire is filled with incredible food destinations – here are suggestions for just one area, between the two National Parks in the county; starting in Whitby in the North York Moors National Park, heading via York, and ending at the Yorkshire Dales National Park.

 

Day One

09:00 Make breakfast a vintage one! You start your itinerary in the coastal town of Whitby and enjoy breakfast treats in the lovely courtyard or the quirkily decorated rooms of Rusty Shears Vintage Tea Shop.

10:00 Learn to cook the Yorkshire way…with fresh, seasonal and local produce at the Arches Cookery School, just half an hour’s drive from Whitby. Chef and teacher Sarah Muir (who’s catered for rock royalty in the past) can guide you through a range of courses, from Whitby Fish to Farm to Fork, celebrating all the fantastic meat and produce from local farmers.

13:00 Take a scenic drive for under an hour through the centre of the North York Moors National Park to the Michelin starred/2 AA Rosette restaurant The Star Inn at Harome. This award-winning gastropub with rooms – charmingly set within a 14th-century thatched inn – sources seasonally from the moors and the nearby sea for its creative menu described as ‘modern Yorkshire style’. Depending on the season, that might include John Dory or lobster with squid ink cracker.

15:00 Make like a local chef and forage the wonderful wild greens, herbs and berries that grow in abundance in Yorkshire. Taste the Wild offers a huge range of foraging courses, as well as ones such as Cooking with Fire and Cider Making. These are mainly full-day courses, so you may want to stay on an extra day to experience one.

17:00 As you head into the historic city of York, stock up on some wonderful Yorkshire foodie souvenirs to take home with you. Henshelwoods Delicatessen is packed with tasty treats ranging from Yorkshire parkin and homemade preserves to more than 70 cheeses.

19:30 Stop by The Rattle Owl for dinner – not only will you find innovative dishes such as east coast crab with tomato consommé or roast pigeon with wild mushroom, barley, pancetta and blackberry but you’ll be dining within a Grade II-listed, 17th-century building. The restaurant also has the Owlet Food & Wine, a microshop stocking organic wine and local beers.

 

Day Two

09:00 Head to a café that’s all about using local and seasonal ingredients – and one that’s featured in The Guardian’s ‘50 Best Breakfasts in the UK’ and Buzzfeed’s ‘21 things you must eat in York’. You’ll find a lot to love about The Pig & Pastry’s breakfast sandwiches; bacon or sausage, Shroomalloumi – that’s halloumi and mushrooms – and a breakfast burger of dry cured bacon, fried egg, avocado, cheddar, smoky mayo and relish.

11:30 Less than an hour from York is the elegant spa town of Harrogate – but it’s not just natural spring waters it’s famed for, its foodie scene is also worth exploring. The three-hour Yorkshire Appetite food tour takes you to explore some of the best eateries in town and taste locally sourced produce, as well as teach you a thing or two about Harrogate’s rich history.

14:30 After a substantial feast on the food tour, set off for a pleasant stroll in the Yorkshire Dales National Park, the edge of which is less than half an hour from Harrogate. Alternatively, travel an hour from the town and stop off for a creamy, indulgent ice cream from Brymor Dairy Ice Cream Parlour, made from the whole milk sourced from the farm’s herd of Guernsey cows. The only difficult choice you’ll have to make is which of its 25 flavours to have.

16:00 Ten minutes from your ice cream destination is another fabulous local produce to try; beer and ale from the Black Sheep Brewery in Masham. A family run brewery, you can take a tour of its traditional brewhouse before heading to the bar to try out a few of its award-winning beers, such as its cult classic cask ale, Monty Python’s Holy Grail, and its strong dark Yorkshire ale Riggwelter.

20:00 While you’re in the Yorkshire Dales take the opportunity to dine at Britain’s highest public house – the Tan Hill Inn. At 1,732 feet (528m) above sea level, this historic 17th-century pub is all exposed beams, stone-flagged floors, a roaring fire in the cooler months and a menu of satisfying pub favourites including Whitby scampi and chips or Yorkshire pudding topped with local Swaledale sausages, all which can be washed down with beers from local breweries. You can also stay overnight in its en-suite rooms and camp site.

 

Food festivals in Yorkshire 2018/2019

2018b

21-22 July: Yorkshire Dales Food & Drink Festival

8 September: Malton Harvest Food Festival

21-30 September: York Food Festival

29-30 September: Holmfirth Food Festival

 

2019 (dates TBC)

23-25 February: Festival of Food, Drink & Rhubarb

April: York Chocolate Festival

May: Malton Food Lovers Festival

May: Great British Food Festival @ Harewood House

June: Dales Festival of Food and Drink

June: Yorkshire Vegan Festival

July: Pontefract Liquorice Festival

 

Getting there

Fly into Yorkshire’s Leeds Bradford international airport or easily travel to its cities and towns from the rest of the UK via train. Leeds is just over two hours from London, around an hour from Manchester; York is just under two hours from London, 1.5 hours from Manchester; Sheffield is almost 2.5 hours from London, less than one hour from Manchester.

10 of the best brewery experiences across North England

Britain loves its beer and ales and, to celebrate International Craft Beer Day on 3 August, we highlight just a few of the brewery tours and events that stretch from the north-west coast of England to the north-east coast, all in locations within easy 1.5-hour train or taxi access of each other. Cheers!

START

Liverpool

The Mad Hatter Brewing Company was set up just five years ago and, as of this year, is one of the small number of breweries run by a woman. The brewery is all producing creative ideas, which have included its signature beer the Penny Lane Pale, a low ABV craft beer with a tropical fruit aroma and a biscuit malt base – named after the street where the first bottle shop stocked them – and the Tzatziki Sour, made using Greek yoghurt to sour and then added mint and cucumber. There aren’t tours available at this small micro-craft brewery, but it does hold festivals, where they pair the beers with food, have live music playing, a kids’ corner on offer in the day session and a fire show in the evening one! The next festival will be held on 25 August, although check its website for further events.

 

ONE HOUR’S TRAIN JOURNEY FROM LIVERPOOL WILL TAKE YOU TO…

Manchester

Runaway Brewery brews its ‘modern-tasting, recognisably British’ beers by hand in small batches at its microbrewery. Head there for its core range of Pale Ales, IPA, Smoked Porter and American Brown Ales and there’s always seasonal ales to try out. As well as brewery tours that take place every Saturday – a fascinating trail through the working brewery, plus a tasting of four beers – you can continue to drink fresh beer from the source in its Tap Room until 8pm. Before you go, check out the brewery’s plans for its monthly pop-up dining rooms, where it teams its beers with local food producers

 

IT’S ONLY 15 MINUTES BY TRAIN FROM MANCHESTER TO…

Stockport, Lancashire

One of the oldest independent brewers in Britain, Robinsons, is located in the heart of Stockport and has been brewing there for nearly two centuries. Real ale is its pièce de résistance and its hour-long brewery tour takes you through Robinsons’ history, the science behind the brewing process and offers tutored tastings of three 1/3-pint samples of its beers. Upgrade to its ‘golden ticket’ and you also receive a gift set and twice as much beer at its Unicorn Bar.

 

BOOK A CAR TO TAKE YOU TO…

Burnley, Lancashire

Once a month, Moorhouse Brewery opens the doors for 45-minute guided tours, four samples of its beers and a pie-and-pea supper, in true Northern style! It’s recently launched a series of new hop-forward keg beers, plus an innovative botanical range and a new look for its cask beers. Its M1 Small Batch Brewery, nestled in the main brewhouse, also allows the brewers to brew in small batches, where they can develop unique recipes, so are well worth following. The tours for 2018 run on 28 September, 19 October and 30 November.

 

JUMP ON A TRAIN FROM THERE TO…

Leeds, Yorkshire

Why visit one brewery when you can visit four in the cool city of Leeds on the Leeds Brewery Tour! Once a month (25 August, 22 September, 20 October and 24 November in 2018), you can begin an afternoon at the North Brewing Co’s taproom, which boasts five core beers and one-off creations in its repertoire, followed by drinks at Indian street food venue Bundobust. Straight after you’ll move onto Tapped, an American-style brew pub with its wide range of keg and cask beer, before finishing at the Northern Monk Brewery for a guided tour and tasting at the brewery, which describes itself as ‘an homage to the monastic heritage of brewing’.

 

IT’S LESS THAN 30 MINUTES BY TRAIN FROM LEEDS TO…

York, Yorkshire

Set within York’s historic city walls, York Brewery was the first traditional working brewery within these walls for more than 40 years. The brewery has always welcomed visitors to see how the traditional ale is made, and runs four guided tours per day, Tuesday to Sunday. You’ll start in the brewery taproom bar to enjoy a pre-tour drink, head out across the brewery to learn everything that goes into making its unique beers and the process ‘from grain to glass’ and stop to admire the 20-barrel brew plant in its brewhouse. Handcrafted ales are the brewery’s passion and you can taste its quirky named, award-winning beers; Centurion’s Ghost Ales, the Guzzler, York Minster Ale and the Yorkshire Terrier.

 

ANOTHER HALF HOUR BY TRAIN FROM YORK AND YOU’RE IN…

Harrogate, Yorkshire

Nestled in the charming spa town of Harrogate is the independent, award-winning Harrogate Brewery. Run by Anton and Sarah Stark, this is a very small brewery although has recently moved into larger premises, so more fermenters could be added to allow the couple to small batch brew more beer. It also has space for a brewery tap that opens once a month, ensuring a special experience. Come here for its strong American-hopped ale, the Horse Head Stetson, its award-winning Vanilla Porter and its ‘strong and complex’ Kursaal Imperial Stout.

 

BOOK A TAXI TO TAKE YOU TO…

Masham, Yorkshire

A family run brewery that has been operating for nearly 30 years, Black Sheep Brewery doesn’t have guided tours, it has ‘shepherded’ tours, four times a day! You’ll be taken to see the traditional brewhouse, explore the science behind the fermenting process and how the brewery selects its ingredients for its distinctive tastes, and why it still uses the Yorkshire Square Fermenting Vessels that were developed more than 200 years ago. Then head to its bar to try out a few of its award-winning beers, such as its cult classic cask ale, Monty Python’s Holy Grail, and its strong dark Yorkshire ale Riggwelter.

 

HAVE THE DRIVER TAKE YOU ON TO…

Durham, County Durham

It may be the oldest working brewery in Durham but the award-winning Durham Brewery is still small and family owned, and continues to grow its beer portfolio, which ranges from dark stouts to light bitters, wheat beer to lagerbier, the latter of which takes three months to mature. Daily tours run twice a day and, as well as touring the brewery and tutored tastings, you’ll hear all about British and Durham beer history and culture. Don’t forget to stop by the shop on your way out to buy your favourite tipple.

 

A 15-MINUTE TRAIN RIDE FROM DURHAM AND YOU’LL ARRIVE IN…

Newcastle-upon-Tyne

Housed in the city’s Palace of Art in Exhibition Park – the last remaining building from the 1929 North East Exhibition – the Wylam Brewery is certainly in a very special location. The brewery – which was founded in 2000 and is a 30-barrel brewery – opens its Brewery Tap Thursdays through to Sundays as well as runs brewery tours every Saturday, where the brewing process is explained, as is the fascinating history of the brewery and, of course, the chance to sample the beer. In October 2018 the venue will also host Craft Beer Calling, an international beer festival.

6 stately homes in Yorkshire to visit before the end of summer

Every region of Britain is peppered with stately homes, living testament to the destination’s rich heritage. Their doors and gardens are open to visitors for a large portion of the year and, with the summer season in full swing, there’s even more to see and do during these months. The north England county of Yorkshire has a fabulous assortment of these grand estates; here are just six you should explore this year.

 

Harewood House

Harewood House stands majestically in the heart of the county, just 20 minutes’ drive from the city of Leeds. This year it’s celebrating the 300th anniversary of Thomas Chippendale, arguably the most famous English furniture maker of the 18th century, who was commissioned back in 1767 to furnish Harewood House. It’s here that you will see one of the greatest collections of Chippendale in the country and 2018 is packed with exhibitions and displays of Chippendale’s work, as well as a programme of contemporary artistic responses to his work. And that’s in addition to Harewood’s vast art collection by masters of the Italian Renaissance, JMW Turner watercolours, family portraits by Reynolds and modern art collected by the Earl and Countess of Harewood. Find a different kind of beauty in its Bird Garden; colourful parrots, Humboldt penguins and the endangered Bali starling are among the 40 species of birds from around the world you can see here.

 

Castle Howard

You’ll recognise this grand family home, half an hour’s drive from York, from its starring role on the big screen; it appeared in both versions of Brideshead Revisited (1981 and 2008) as well as in numerous other TV and movie productions. More than 300 years old, it boasts 1,000 acres of grounds – with woodland walks, fountains, lakes and temples – meaning Castle Howard has plenty of space to offer a diverse programme of events through the summer months. August will host the Castle Howard Proms, a magical classical concert with guest soloists include soprano superstar Lesley Garrett, and a programme of favourites from the world-famous Proms, further enhanced with a fantastic firework finale.

This year also sees Castle Howard host an exhibition by one of the UK's leading contemporary artists, Mat Collishaw, as well as its award-winning exhibitions such as Duty Calls, exploring the stories from the castle in times of war, and Brideshead Restored, about how it was transformed into film sets for both the 1981 and 2008 versions of Brideshead Revisited.

 

Ripley Castle

Come to Ripley Castle to for enthralling tales of plague and persecution, renaissance and enlightenment and the castle’s role in the industrial revolution. It’s been in the Ingilby family for more than 700 years and its huge parkland means it’s also perfect for outdoor activities. The Castle has teamed up with Live For Today Adventures, who have brought bushcraft skills, archery, body zorbing, kayaking and orienteering to the castle’s grounds.
Ripley Castle and Gardens is situated just three miles from Harrogate in North Yorkshire, on the edge of the Yorkshire Dales National Park, but it also has its very own deer park to explore; wander among 1,000-year old oak trees and be captivated by wildlife from deer to geese, herons to kingfishers.

 

Brodsworth Hall & Gardens

For an in-depth insight into how country houses operated during the Victorian era, Brodsworth Hall & Gardens is the place to visit. Its ‘conserved as found’ when it was built in the 1860s and has witnessed few changes, aside from the garden restoration and general conservation. Now looked after by English Heritage, this stately home – located 45 minutes’ drive from Leeds – still has many of its original furnishings, a huge Victorian kitchen and scullery. Don’t expect the rooms to be all on a grand scale; the library's original wallpaper and carpets are faded, and the woodworking room is full of clutter, but that just adds to its charm. This August you can relive what life was like at Brodsworth during wartime; climb inside a biplane replica, try your hand at soldier school and hear about the work of medics during World War One.

 

Newby Hall and Gardens
Home to a contemporary sculpture park, 25 acres of land and glorious interiors, Newby Hall in Ripon (a 50-minute drive from both Leeds and York) is bringing a special exhibition to its home this summer. As part of its own dolls house exhibition, which is now the permanent home to one of the finest collections of dollhouses and miniatures in the world thanks to collectors Caroline Hamilton and Jane Fiddick, this July will welcome an evening with Charlie & Lola creator Lauren Child, as she introduces her dolls houses to the collection, on loan for the summer.

Visitors will also love exploring garden views from its Miniature Railway, which runs along the River Ure, as well as its charming Teddy Bear Collection, housed in a newly built home within the gardens of Newby Hall, collected by British TV personality Gyles Brandreth; look out for some very famous bears among the collection. And, this summer, the stately home also welcomes its annual Historic Vehicle Rally to its grounds as well as alfresco Shakespeare performances.

 

Sewerby Hall and Gardens
For a stately home with stunning coastal views, head to Sewerby Hall and Gardens; this impressive country house and estate is perched on a cliff-top with views over Bridlington Bay on East Yorkshire’s coast, just over an hour’s drive from Leeds. Set in early 19th-century parkland, a restoration programme a few years ago recreated how the house would have been in the early 1900s, with furniture loaned from London’s Victoria & Albert Museum, as well as a collection of memorabilia that was once owned by the famous local aviator, Amy Johnson. Visitors can get fully immersed in the experience, with the chance to dress up as Edwardian servants or as members of the residing Graeme family, play with Edwardian toys in the nursery and view an interactive display portraying life as a servant during that era.

Summer is also a perfect time to enjoy its landscaped gardens and woodland walks as well as its on-site zoo, which is home to penguins, lemurs, pygmy goats, llamas and macaws. You can also stay on the estate in one of the holiday cottages.

 

Getting to Yorkshire: York is just under two hours by train from London, 1.5 hours from Manchester and 2.5 hours from Edinburgh. Reach Leeds from London by train in under 2.5 hours, in one hour from Manchester and in 3 hours from Edinburgh.