Lonely Planet Unveils the UK’s Top Unmissable Experiences!

On Tuesday 13 August, Lonely Planet unveiled their first ultimate Ultimate UK Travelist, revealing the top 500 unmissable attractions across Britain, Northern Ireland and the Channel Islands.

Compiling the most exciting, unique and memorable experiences, the list reveals all that is great about Britain – with the world-renowned Edinburgh Festival topping the list!

With icons like the British Museum in London, Stonehenge in south-west England, and the Giant’s Causeway in Northern Ireland all featuring in the Top 10 Experiences, the country’s icons are well and truly represented. But the list is also jam-packed with lesser-known but no less impressive highlights – from hobnobbing with royalty in Glamis Castle’s rose-tinted turrets to wild swimming in Durdle Door.

Compiled from the Lonely Planet roundup, we’ve selected 21 of the most unusual, surprising and unforgettable activities, sights and landmarks – for a truly unmissable British experience.

Yorkshire Dales Adventure, Yorkshire (number 18)

Coming in at number 18 on the Lonely Planet list, the Yorkshire Dales are a fairy-tale landscape of heather moorland and rolling green valleys. Home to some of Britain’s finest karst limestone scenery, the Dales also offer some of the country’s best hiking and cycling routes. And with hidden highlights including Forbidden Corner - a labyrinthine walled garden, and Hardraw Force - England’s highest unbroken waterfall, to explore, it’s the ideal spot for travellers looking to discover the lesser-known side of Yorkshire.

Wild Swimming at Durdle Door, Dorset (number 29)

Located in the turquoise waters of the Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site, the ancient Durdle Door archway is one of Britain’s most unforgettable destinations for wild swimming. Soak up the sunshine on the pristine golden sands before taking the plunge and swimming beneath the monumental limestone archway, which was carved by the waves over centuries. Ranking at number 29, Durdle Door is an experience that testifies to the power of nature and the forces that shaped one of Britain’s most spectacular coastlines.

Hike the South West Coast Path, South-West England (number 37)

Combining the highlights of the Devon, Cornish, Somerset and Dorset coastlines, the South West Coast Path is 628 miles of staggering British beauty. Requiring around six weeks to complete in full, the path takes in sunlit beaches, picturesque fishing villages and major highlights including Tintagel Castle, the birthplace of King Arthur. With terrain ranging from easy to challenging, there’s something for every walking enthusiast looking to explore the delights of the south west.

Wild camping on Dartmoor, Devon (number 56)

Wild ponies, mist-covered moors and crystal-clear rivers await on a wild camping trip to Dartmoor. Get back to nature and sleep under the stars on a camping experience that reveals the rugged beauty of one of England’s largest open moorlands, all while discovering its staggering history at landmarks including Spinster’s Rock, which dates back to 4,000BC.

Island hop Scotland’s Western Seaboard, Scotland (number 58)

From exploring the only island country park in Britain to sipping the rich peaty whisky produced by Bowmore, the oldest distillery in Scotland, island hopping across the western seaboard reveals Scotland’s traditions and landscapes in all their glory. Discover Duart Castle, home of the Clan Maclean, and Iona Abbey, the ancient burial site of Scottish Kings, and spot magnificent red deer on the island of Jura. From wildlife to whisky, Scotland’s western islands have it all.

Deer Spotting Safari, Exmoor (number 61)

Get up-close-and-personal with Britain’s native wildlife on a deer spotting safari in Exmoor National Park. A former royal forest, the park is home to around 3,000 red deer – the largest wild land animals in England! Spot knobbly-kneed calves in spring and summer or see majestic stags battle it out in the search for a mate under a canopy of autumn leaves. With Exmoor ponies and a staggering array of flora and fauna to discover, it’s no surprise this experience ranks at an impressive number 61 on the list.

Coast to Coast Path, Northern England (number 76)

One of Britain’s most popular routes for walkers, the Coast to Coast Path comes in at number 76. Designed by renowned author and fellwanderer Alfred Wainwright, the path encompasses 190 miles of northern England’s most impressive landscapes. Covering three of our finest National Parks - the Lake District, the Yorkshire Dales and the North York Moors – and roaming across terrain that ranges from flower strewn dales to mountainous peaks, the path is perfect for cyclists and walkers looking to discover Britain in all its diverse glory.

Banksy Trail, Bristol (number 85)

Follow the trail of Banksy, one of Britain’s best known street artists in his birthplace, Bristol! One of the country’s lesser-known urban delights, the city is awash with quirky culture, cool boutiques and an eclectic dining scene, in addition to a wide array of impressive street art. With a range of street arts tours on offer, visitors will discover the impact that Banksy has had on pop culture and the art scene, and can even try their hand at creating their own graffiti.

Dungeness Train, Kent (number 110)

Jump aboard the Romney, Hythe & Dymchurch Railway steam train and step back in time on a journey to Dungeness. Best known for the historic battle of 1652, Dungeness is now classified as Britain’s only desert. Home to a fascinating array of plant, bird and sea life, this Site of Special Scientific Interest is well worth discovering. See the traditional cottages of local fishermen and find out more about their lives, before climbing the historic lighthouse for incredible views of the English Channel towards France.

Victorian Tunnel Tour, Newcastle (number 167)

Step back in time on a tour of Newcastle’s secret Victoria Tunnel. Originally constructed in 1842 to transport coal below the city streets, the tunnel was used as an air raid shelter during World War II and is rich in history. Experience an air raid re-enactment and walk beneath the city’s major landmarks, including Hadrian’s Wall, before hearing tales of the resident ghost and the city’s Victorian past.

Spot Puffins and Seals on Rathlin Island, Northern Ireland (number 194)

Wildlife lovers and photography enthusiasts should make a beeline for the rugged cliffs of Rathlin Island. Managed in part by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, the island is particularly appealing during the birds’ nesting season. Head to the West Light Viewpoint to spot baby puffins and their parents cavorting through the undergrowth in spring and summer, see native species including kittiwakes and guillemots, and make sure to look out for basking seals, porpoises and even dolphins!

Channel Your Inner Braveheart at Stirling Castle, Scotland (number 217)

Trace the footsteps of Scottish hero William Wallace and discover his true history on a visit to Stirling Castle, the setting of the 1995 epic Braveheart. Scale the 246 steps to the William Wallace Monument and enjoy staggering views of the surrounding countryside. Explore the Royal Palace, the Great Hall and Queen Anne Gardens, hear tales of legendary combats including the Battle of Bannockburn, and learn the story of King Robert the Bruce – a Scottish National Hero.

Ride Some of Wales’ Wildest Waves Along Hell’s Mouth Beach, Wales (number 232)

Surfing enthusiasts can ride some of Britain’s best waves at Hell’s Mouth Beach in Gwynedd. Home to the Wakeboard Festival in July, the beach offers four miles of sandy shores, perfect azure water and even the chance to spot harbour porpoises and bottlenose dolphins. With a current that’s gentle enough for swimmers looking to relax in the waves, but strong enough to guarantee some perfect waves, the beach is one of the area’s best kept secrets for lovers of water sports.

Branch Out at the National Botanic Garden of Wales, South Wales (number 261)

Featuring the world’s largest single-span glasshouse, a national nature reserve, and a variety of beautiful and innovative themed gardens, the National Botanic Garden of Wales has something for every green-fingered enthusiast. Discover the medicinal secrets of local herbs at the Apothecary’s Garden, meet native species at the British Bird of Prey Centre, or enjoy an ever-changing range of flora-themed events throughout the year.

World Conker Champs, Northamptonshire (number 317)

We Brits love a quirky festival, and at number 317 the World Conker Championships fits the bill perfectly! Played using the seeds of horse chestnut trees, the championship sees competitors smash their way to victory in the picturesque Northamptonshire village of Southwick. Hosted by the Ashton Conker Club, the competition has taken place since 1965 and involves players using a conker, threaded with a piece of string, to break their opponent’s conker. Competitors take it in turns to strike their opponent’s piece, with the winner owning the conker that does not break.

Whizz Through the Zip World Slate Caverns in Blaneu Ffestiniog, Wales (number 327)

Zip World, near the historic mining town of Blaenau Ffestiniog, offer guests the chance to climb through a unique underground course in a disused slate mine or zip down Europe’s largest zip wire! Surrounded by stunning Welsh scenery, it’s an unbeatable place to bounce and slide through a huge underground adventure, for an action-packed experience to remember.

Margate Shell Grotto, Margate (number 339)

An ancient temple, a pagan place of worship, or even the residence of a cult – nearly 200 years after it was discovered, the debate still rages as to the origins of the Margate Shell Grotto! Nicknamed Shellhenge and decorated with an incredible 4.6 million shells, the grotto is a unique work of art that has to be seen to be believed. Join the debate and wander along 70ft of chalk tunnels to discover the 2,000sq foot mosaic, which features oysters, ancient gods and even the tree of life among its swirling, intricate patterns.

Learn to Cook at River Cottage, Devon (number 392)

Founded by British celebrity chef, Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, the chance to cook at the renowned River Cottage comes in as a foodie favourite at number 392. With a wide range of courses including gluten-free Christmas cooking, easy cheese making and meat curing and smoking, visitors will have the chance to discover the secrets of the acclaimed TV series, savour local produce and learn how to create truly scrumptious British recipes.

Star Spot on Lundy Island, South-West England (number 452)

A designated Dark Sky Discovery Site, Lundy Island has no street lighting or electricity after midnight, making it a stargazing spot that’s out of this world! At night, budding astronomers can expect to spot the Milky Way, distant galaxies and meteor showers, while its incredibly diverse flora and fauna, including basking sharks, dolphins and puffins, make it a nature lover’s paradise.

Hobnob with Royalty in Glamis Castle’s Rose-Tinted Turrets, Scotland (number 468)

One of the lesser-known royal residences, this fairy-tale castle inspired Shakespeare’s Macbeth and was the childhood home to HRH The Queen Mother. Visitors can explore the birthplace of HRH Princess Margaret, discover the sprawling gardens and admire the rose-tinted turrets. Alternatively, take a guided tour and learn the secrets of the Earls of Strathmore and Kinghorne, who have resided here since 1372.

Learn to Churn at Wensleydale Creamery, Yorkshire (number 496)

The British love affair with all things cheese-related is long established. Now, visitors can get in on the act and learn to churn beautifully British cheese at Wensleydale Creamery, one of Yorkshire’s best known producers. With cheese and butter-making demonstrations held throughout the day, plus cookery demonstrations of popular local dishes including Wensleydale Chicken and Yorkshire Rarebit, the creamery is a tasty experience for food fans on a trip to Britain.

10 fantastiske ting at tage sig til i York

Den smukke muromgærdede by York har 2000 års historie og kulturarv, og har et utroligt udvalg af ting at lave og se især for historieinteresserede. Fra sin uundgåelige gotiske katedral til labyrinten af middelalderlige gader har vi formået at reducere listen til blot 10 ting. Hvis du planlægger at tilbringe et par dage, anbefaler vi et York Pass, som sparer dig penge ved adgang til mange af byens attraktioner.

 1.  Se York med gargoyle’s-eye 

 

Over Yorks labyrint af gamle gader troner de tre muskulære tårne på ​​i York Minster, den største gotiske bygning i Storbritannien. Katedralen, du ser i dag, blev påbegyndt i 1220, tog omkring 250 år at bygge og anses nu for en af ​​Europas fineste middelalderlige bygninger. Højdepunkter her inkluderer nogle af de ældste og smukkeste glasmosaikker i Storbritannien, (østvinduet er verdens største middelalderglasmosaik i et enkelt vindue) og krypten indeholder noget af den oprindelige kirke fra det 11. århundrede. Men det er den heftige 275-trins vandretur til toppen af ​​Central Tower, der er den rigtige showstopper her. Få vejret og se i gargoyle-perspektiv ud over Yorkshire, der er spredt ud nedenfor lige som så mange andre forpustede besøgende har gjort det i de sidste 600 år.

2.  Tag tilbage i tiden til et victoriansk fængsel

Hvis du nogensinde har spekuleret på, hvordan livet kunne have været for 200 år siden, kan York Castle Museum kaste lidt lys over den sag. Oplev seværdigheder og lyde fra det 18. århundredes York på en vidunderligt rekreativ victoriansk gade, før du udforsker museets andre historiske udstillinger, der dækker emner fra 1. verdenskrig til 1960'ernes popkultur. Museet har til huse i et tidligere fængsel, men navnet stammer fra, at huset står på stedet for et slot bygget af William Erobreren. Museet, der er beliggende i det centrale York, har gratis entre med et York Pass.

​3.  Tag på trainspotting

Den fantastiske størrelse, de glatte linjer og den dampdrevne tiltrækningskraft fra de lokomotiver, der befinder dig på National Railway Museum, er nok til at gøre selv den mest rolige til en ivrig trainspotter. De store skatte i de rummelige haller omfatter det eneste Bullet Train uden for Japan, Queen Victoria's 'Palace on wheels' og det smukke Duchess of Hamilton, der er en art deco-triumf i design og teknik. Åben hver dag, og gratis entre.

4. Besøg et af verdens største palæer

Med en Lonely Planet-titel som et af ​​verdens ti største palæer og fantastiske huse er Castle Howard absolut en kort bustur fra York City værd. Som en passende kulisse fra et drama, har det storslåede palæ fra det 18. århundrede, omgivet af frodige haver og bølgende bakker, været baggrunden for mange film- og tv-produktioner. Der er meget at udforske her med stedet feterede skuespilsfortid. Når man har ladet sig forbløffe af det dramatiske interiør og den verdensberømte kunstsamling, kan man gå en tur i det store parkområde med søer og templer, og tage sig tid til te og kage i den hyggelige café. Entreen er gratis med et York Pass

5. Se, hør og lugt en vikingelandsby

Tag en rejse tilbage gennem tiden til de dage, hvor de vilde fra Nord havde koloniseret York i det 10. århundred. Se, hør og lugt sågar en vikingelandsby komplet med smed, opholdsrum og et historisk nøjagtigt vikingetoilet. Jorvik Viking Centre er en fin blanding af historie og morskab, der bringer nogle af de forbavsende velbevarede genstande, der er udgravet under byen, til livet. Hvis du har lyst til en mere praktisk tilgang til historien, må du ikke gå glip af DIG, en attraktion der giver dig mulighed for at lege arkæolog.

BEMÆRK: JORVIK VIKING CENTER ER MIDLERTIDIGT LUKKET GRUNDET OVERSVØMMELSE. VI HENVISER TIL HJEMMESIDEN FOR YDERLIGERE OPLYSNINGER.

6. Nyd en traditionel eftermiddagste

 

Du har været oppe i det midterste tårn i York Minster, du har ladet dig bjergtage af dampbæsterne+ på National Railway Museum, og du har muligvis endda set et ægte vikingetoilet. Nu har du vist fortjent en kop te. Og stedet til det skal være Betty' Tea Rooms, , i Yorkshire, der serverer lækkert bagværk, kager og opfriskende te i de same smukke omgivelser, som siden 1930'erne. Stedet er udsmykket af de samme håndværkere, der klargjorde Queen Mary Ocean Liner. Du må bestemt ikke gå glip af en kop te i disse omgivelser.

7. Smag dig gennem chokoladens historie

 

En af Yorks nyere attraktioner er også den sødeste. Der er blevet fremstillet chokolade i byen i 300 år, og York var engang hjemsted for 2 af verdens store chokolademærker - Rowntree's og Terrys. Ikoniske chokolader fra Aero til Smarties og den mægtige Kit Kat begyndte livet her, så det er et godt sted at lære om chokoladefremstillingsprocessen fra bønne til bar. PåChocolate – York's Sweet Story smager du dig gennem chokoladehistorien, opdager generationer af konfekturehemmeligheder og afslutter din tur i Chocolate Bar for at nyde ekstravagancer som All Day Chocolate Breakfast og Ultimate Chocolate Fondue.

8. Tag en slentretur på Shambles

 

Beliggende i hjertet af de slidte, gamle, snoede veje erThe Shambles, der er en af ​​de bedst bevarede middelalderlige gader i Europa. Dens oprindelse er så gammel, at den engang blev nævnt i Dommedagsbogen, mens de overhængende tømmerindrammede huse, der stadig står i dag, er en bemærkelsesværdig påmindelse om byens fortid. Nu er de maleriske bygninger fyldt med hyggelige caféer og butikker, der sælger alt fra slik til håndlavet sæbe.

9. Hør skrækindjagende historier om York i romertiden

Er du til gode gys? I York Dungeon kan du forvente at spjætte af frygt, der ændres til latter, når du hører skræmmende historier om byens grusomme fortid. Med Yorks historie om vikingeangreb, hekse og pest, er der mange gyselige historier at fortælle, og du vil møde nogle af områdets mest tølperagtige karakterer, i takt med at du føres igennem en række scener i det spændende liveshow.

10. Gå på Englands bedst bevarede middelaldermur

York er beliggende i det nordlige England i Yorkshire. Det er cirka 2 timer med tog fra London eller kun 1 time og 15 minutter fra Manchester. Få mere at vide om byen York.

Sådan kommer du hertil

York er beliggende i det nordlige England i Yorkshire. Det er cirka 2 timer med tog fra London eller kun 1 time og 15 minutter Manchester. Få mere at vide om byen York

10 fantastiske ting at tage sig til i York

The Best Fringe Festivals in 2019

Whether it’s a celebration of live theatre, dance, arts or comedy, fringe festivals can be found in nearly every corner of Britain. Laugh along with the nation’s finest comedians as they prepare for their major tours, take in the sounds of up-and-coming musicians and discover new takes on some of the finest theatrical works. Packed with live entertainment and clever improvisation, these are the best Fringe Festivals to enjoy in 2019.

Maidstone Fringe

Marking the diversity of new and original music in Kent and the South East of England, Maidstone Fringe returns for a 9th year in 2019. Spread across numerous venues in the town centre, including pubs, clubs and music venues, as well as in cafes and coffee shops, the majority of the musical performances are free to attend. Expect a wide array of music too, with everything from rock, indie and pop-punk to blues, acoustic, folk, dance and hip-hop on the bill for 2019.

When? 1-6 May

Brighton Fringe

England’s largest arts festival, featuring more than 4,500 performances and events, takes place across Brighton, embracing all forms of art and artistic impression. Running alongside the Brighton Festival, the Brighton Fringe includes cabaret, classical concerts, club nights, comedy, theatre shows and a host of exhibitions, as well as street performances and exciting pop-up venues. In 2019, the International Seasons programme is also set to welcome some of the best contemporary performances by artists from France, the Netherlands, Finland, Australia, Iceland, Korea and Sweden, among others, showcasing the event’s global appeal.

When? 3 May – 2 June

Bath Fringe

Incorporating 3 weekends and the weeks in between, the Bath Fringe is a celebration of all the arts, meaning there are few rules regarding what is on. Both the people of Bath and venues in the city have a big say over what is included, with a detailed events list usually published in April.

When? 24 May - 9 June

Plymouth Fringe

An annual celebration of theatre and live performance, Plymouth Fringe welcomes some of the best talent in the South West, as well as others from across Britain. With venues in the city centre and on the waterfront, expect a host of inspiring performances as the Fringe marks its 5th consecutive year.

When? 27 May – 1 June

Ludlow Fringe

Ludlow Fringe is an independent arts, community and culture festival with a focus on inclusivity. Many of its events are free to attend, while prices are capped at £15 on those that are not, to ensure that events are affordable and accessible. Be sure to check out the Annual Ludlow Fringe Art Trail too, a diverse collection of affordable art by local and national artists that is showcased in 25 different pop-up venues and galleries. Featuring paintings, sculpture, photography, textiles, print and jewellery, and much more besides, the quirky venues are all located a short distance from the town centre.

When? 15-30 June

Guildford Fringe

Now in its 7th year, the Guildford Fringe is a multi-arts festival that features comedy, poetry, theatre, music, visual arts, workshops, burlesque and an abundance of family-friendly shows. Gag House Comedy Superstars kicks-off proceedings on 28 June, featuring comedian and actor Hal Cruttenden, Paul Sinha from TV’s The Chase and Susan Murray. Around 125 events made up the 2018 Guildford Fringe, and its organisers are expecting even more for 2019.

When? 28 June – 28 July

Greater Manchester Fringe

A multi-venue arts festival packed with comedy stand up, dance, magic shows, orchestras, new writing and a wealth of other art forms, the Greater Manchester Fringe provides a stage for performers to showcase their skills. It often acts as a platform for productions too - many past shows have moved onto the region’s established theatres including the Lowry Theatre, the Royal Exchange and the Bolton Octagon, or have embarked on nationwide tours. Now in its 8th year, a full programme of events for 2019 will be released at the start of May.

When 1-31 July

The Great Yorkshire Fringe

As part of its 5th anniversary celebrations, the Great Yorkshire Fringe is set to expand across York in 2019 to feature even more cultural venues. The historic city’s well-known thoroughfare, Parliament Street, will be transformed into an exciting festival hub offering everything from comedy and cabaret to music, theatre and fun for all the family. Performances from comedian Henning Wehn and writer, broadcaster and actor Gyles Brandreth already feature on the bill for 2019, as well as Austentatious: The Improvised Jane Austen Novel, an entirely improvised performance showcasing Jane Austen’s work in a new light.

When? 18-28 July (20 July, Austentatious: The Improvised Jane Austen Novel; 21 July, Gyles Brandreth; 27 July, Henning Wehn)

Llangollen Fringe

Final details for the 2019 Llangollen Fringe are yet to be announced, but the celebration of music, dance, film and art will return to the small town of Llangollen, in North Wales, this year. With an eclectic mix of musical and artistic talents on its bill each year, the festival is town centre based, providing easy access to pubs, restaurants and car parks. Taking centre stage is the Victorian Llangollen Town Hall, which boasts its own 300-seat capacity theatre.

When? 19-28 July

Reading Fringe

Designed to support emerging artists and to provide a platform for them ahead of the world famous Edinburgh Fringe, the Reading Fringe welcomes acts to the town from all over the globe. With venues spread across the town, the theme for 2019 is ‘Into the woods – and beyond’, an exploration of what it means to be part of an ecosystem and a consideration of what the future holds for Earth.

When? 20-28 July

Ventnor Fringe

A multi-award winning arts festival on the Isle of Wight, the Ventnor Fringe includes an array of exciting venues in the eclectic hillside town. Alongside cabaret, music, theatre and art, visitors can also expect to see pop-up cinemas, basement bars and mystery tours.

When? 23-28 July

Camden Fringe

From its origins in 2006 as an alternative to the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, the Camden Fringe provides performers with a chance to try out new and untested material. Encompassing all forms of performing arts, the Fringe welcomes both ambitious newcomers and experienced performers as they deliver new writing, sketch comedy, poetry, improvisation and everything in between. A full programme of events is expected in spring 2019.

When? 29 July – 25 August

Edinburgh Fringe

Renowned around the globe as being a platform for creative freedom, the Edinburgh Fringe Festival is the single biggest celebration of arts and culture in the world. Welcoming the finest performers to the Scottish capital, from the biggest names in show business to emerging stars, and covering all sorts of art forms, the festival features more than 50,000 performances each year. More than 300 venues provide the stages, alongside street events and market stalls, showcasing theatre, dance, comedy, cabaret, children’s shows, musicals, opera, exhibitions and speech – if it’s a form of art, it’s probably on the bill somewhere.

When? 2-26 August