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    Why we love Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park

    Love to escape the crowds? You’ve come to the right place: though it’s less than an hour’s drive from Glasgow, this national park is so vast, and so wild, that you’ll feel blissfully far from the masses. While the shores of Loch Lomond – Britain’s largest lake – can be busy in summer, there are pristine woods to explore, mountains to climb, and plenty of quieter waters to paddle, swim, kayak and cruise.

    Indeed, the national park’s landscape is more of a ‘waterscape’: the long shape of Loch Lomond forms a natural divide within its boundaries, with the Arrochar Alps to the east, and the Trossachs to the west – a region of forest-filled braes (hillsides) and picturesque shores, including lochs Katrine, Achray and Chon. For strong-legged hikers and cyclists, the national park’s 21 munros (peaks above 914.4m/3,000ft) are irresistible, though there are lots of gentler trails to enjoy.

    Here’s how to have your own big adventure in Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park.

    Things to do in Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park

    Kayak, canoe, cruise or wild swim? With its watersports and boat trips, Loch Lomond is a refreshing place to unwind.

    Find your adventure at Loch Lomond
    Bluebells in springtime on Inchcailloch - an island on Loch Lomond just a short distance from Balmaha.
    Loch Lomond

    For spectacular views of Loch Lomond, head for the summit of Ben Lomond – a challenge that suits hikers with good fitness levels.

    Browse Ben Lomond’s best walks
    Ben Lomond
    Ben Lomond

    Crossing open moors, lofty peaks, and forest-lined lochs, the West Highland Way serves up 96 miles (154km) of invigorating hiking.

    Hit the West Highland Way
    Walkers taking in the view of Loch Lomond from Conic Hill part of the West Highland Way
    West Highland Way

    See owls, eagles, hawks and falcons in flight, and get hands-on with conservation at this wildlife-focused attraction.

    Book tickets to Loch Lomond Bird of Prey Centr
    visitscotland_29407110986
    Loch Lomond Bird of Prey Centre

    This charming garden boasts huge 150-year-old Redwoods, plus blooms and blossoms galore. Look out for wild red squirrels too!

    Book tickets to Benmore Botanic Garden
    benmore_gardens_2019_01
    Benmore Botanic Garden

    Kayak, canoe, cruise or wild swim? With its watersports and boat trips, Loch Lomond is a refreshing place to unwind.

    Find your adventure at Loch Lomond
    Bluebells in springtime on Inchcailloch - an island on Loch Lomond just a short distance from Balmaha.
    Loch Lomond

    For spectacular views of Loch Lomond, head for the summit of Ben Lomond – a challenge that suits hikers with good fitness levels.

    Browse Ben Lomond’s best walks
    Ben Lomond
    Ben Lomond

    Crossing open moors, lofty peaks, and forest-lined lochs, the West Highland Way serves up 96 miles (154km) of invigorating hiking.

    Hit the West Highland Way
    Walkers taking in the view of Loch Lomond from Conic Hill part of the West Highland Way
    West Highland Way

    See owls, eagles, hawks and falcons in flight, and get hands-on with conservation at this wildlife-focused attraction.

    Book tickets to Loch Lomond Bird of Prey Centr
    visitscotland_29407110986
    Loch Lomond Bird of Prey Centre

    This charming garden boasts huge 150-year-old Redwoods, plus blooms and blossoms galore. Look out for wild red squirrels too!

    Book tickets to Benmore Botanic Garden
    benmore_gardens_2019_01
    Benmore Botanic Garden

    Places to stay in Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park

    Lavish hotels

    The national park may be wild, but it’s home to some seriously swish hotels. Overlooking the lochs you’ll find historic retreats with fine dining, spas, golf and watersports.

    Lochside cottages

    You don’t need a big budget to stay on the waterside: there are cute cottages, forest lodges and glamping cabins dotting the shores of Loch Lomond and beyond.

    Off-grid camping

    Love the great outdoors? Ignite your sense of adventure on a wild camping trip. It’s legal throughout Scotland, but you’ll need to buy a permit (online) for the national park.

    Getting to Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park

    The national park is just north of Glasgow and Edinburgh, whose airports are its closest international hubs – around 40 and 90 minutes’ drive respectively. If you’re travelling from England, journey times are long (London is seven hours 30 minutes’ drive away), so consider rail or coach services instead: the direct train from London to Glasgow takes four hours 30 minutes, or there’s an overnight service to Arrochar & Tarbet.

    Getting around

    From trains and buses to cruises and the Waterbus, there’s a multitude of ways to get around on public transport. For hikers, many munros are even accessible without a car – so you can relax and enjoy the scenery as you travel. For the latest timetables and routes for buses and trains, use the National Park Journey Planner app.

    By boat

    The Waterbus, a scheduled boat service, runs throughout Loch Lomond and Loch Katrine – putting their walks and attractions within easy reach.

    By train

    The southern stretch of the West Highland Line (from Glasgow) runs right through the National Park, and links up with the Waterbus at Arrochar & Tarbet.

    By car

    If you’re hiring a car, consider an electric vehicle: there are EV charging points throughout the national park, including on the banks of Loch Lomond. ​

    Want to know more?

    You’ll find insider tips and the latest travel update on the national park’s official website.