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    Why we love North Wales

    North Wales is packed with castles and they provide just some of its stunning backdrop. The rest comes from its coastlines, valleys, hills and towns. From the impressive vistas of Portmeirion – a mini replica of the Italia Riviera to the island of Anglesey with 125 miles of coastline to an amble along Wales’ longest pier in Victorian resort Llunduno. Whether it’s photographing Britain’s longest place name or its tiniest house, paddle-boarding under dark skies or taking on the world’s fastest zipline, sleeping on a cliff’s edge, visiting anything from prisons to galleries, feasting on fresh lobster to locally foraged seaweed or partying the night away, North Wales give you a generous slice of it all. All this and in easy reach of Snowdonia National Park.

    Things to do in North Wales

    For beautiful beaches and charming seaside villages, look to the Llŷn Peninsula on the North Wales coast.

    Explore the Llŷn Peninsula
    WCP_DJI_0049
    Llŷn Peninsula, North Wales

    Find a little slice of the Italian Riviera in this purpose-built village resort and gardens.

    Find out more about Portmeirion
    Revellers at a forest gig at music festival
    Portmeirion

    Standing tall for more than 700 years, this Medieval fortress overlooks the pretty town of Conwy – both a joy to explore.

    Book tickets to Conway Castle
    A castle lit up at night in winter snow near harbour
    Conwy Castle, Conwy

    From the top of Holyhead Mountain, you can see the entire Anglesey coastline – and even as far as Ireland.

    Plan your Holyhead Mountain hike
    Awaiting image
    Holyhead Mountain, Anglesey

    Since 1809, this tiny white lighthouse has saved thousands of lives. Discover its stories in the museum, and enjoy epic views from the top.

    Visit South Stack Lighthouse
    South Stack Lighthouse, Anglesey
    South Stack Lighthouse, Anglesey

    For beautiful beaches and charming seaside villages, look to the Llŷn Peninsula on the North Wales coast.

    Explore the Llŷn Peninsula
    WCP_DJI_0049
    Llŷn Peninsula, North Wales

    Find a little slice of the Italian Riviera in this purpose-built village resort and gardens.

    Find out more about Portmeirion
    Revellers at a forest gig at music festival
    Portmeirion

    Standing tall for more than 700 years, this Medieval fortress overlooks the pretty town of Conwy – both a joy to explore.

    Book tickets to Conway Castle
    A castle lit up at night in winter snow near harbour
    Conwy Castle, Conwy

    From the top of Holyhead Mountain, you can see the entire Anglesey coastline – and even as far as Ireland.

    Plan your Holyhead Mountain hike
    Awaiting image
    Holyhead Mountain, Anglesey

    Since 1809, this tiny white lighthouse has saved thousands of lives. Discover its stories in the museum, and enjoy epic views from the top.

    Visit South Stack Lighthouse
    South Stack Lighthouse, Anglesey
    South Stack Lighthouse, Anglesey

    Places to stay in North Wales

    Conwy

    Conwy makes for a good base, and is central to the north Wales area. It also offers easy access to Snowdonia. And for such a small place it offers a lot to see, from the castle to the estuary, cottages with slate roofs, long beach walks nearby, town walls and buzzing cafes, and pubs and restaurants .

    Anglesey

    This island offers everything from a on-cliff camping experience through to stays at country houses with spas or even a chateau. Take in its lighthouses to its beaches and coastal paths, or look to food festivals and the chance to cross the Menai Suspension Bridge. Check out Beaumaris for its shops and cafes, or pitch up a picnic at Penmon. While Benlech Bay offers lots of B & B’s for an overnight stay.

    Llandudno

    A dream-worthy place to stay. Running along the fringes of the Creuddyn Penisula, this Victorian seaside destination is bursting with historic tales, outstanding nature and Wales’ longest pier. Check out Great Orme, the area’s mini-mountain and journey 207 metres high to the summit on a ride on Britain’s lengthiest cable car. 

    Getting around

    The closest international airport to North Wales is Liverpool John Lennon Airport, around 75 miles (121 km) from spots such as Conwy and Llandudno. Direct train services from London Euston to Holyhead, the largest town on the Isle of Anglesey, take fewer than four hours.

    By bus

    Fflecsi Bus operate across North Wales and can be booked by app.

    The Dee Valley Picturesque Bus service is a circular route and runs every Saturday until 30 October, the route links Llangollen and the surrounding villages to popular local attractions.

    The Snowdon Sherpa is a unique bus service that travels around the foot of Snowdon, the service is fully accessible.

    By train

    A scenic and eco-friendly way to travel around North Wales is by train. The North Wales Coast Railway hugs the coastline, and stops off at places such as Prestatyn, Rhyl, Colwyn Bay, Llandudno, Conwy, Bangor and Holyhead.

    The Conwy Valley line runs from Llandudno through Snowdonia to Blaenau Ffestiniog.

    By foot

    A lot of North Wales is calling out to walkers, amblers and hikers. Check out the North Wales section of the Welsh coastal path.

    Want to know more?

    Check out Visit Wales for top insider tips and travel inspiration.