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    Why we love Snowdonia

    What’s your adventure? Because Snowdonia is full of them – and from its sky-scraping peaks to plunging glacial valleys, it’s bursting with breathtaking scenery too.

    This 823 square-mile national park is catnip for adrenaline seekers, who flock to climb, cycle, raft and zip through North Wales’s wildest corners, but you don’t need nerves of steel to appreciate its charms: there are pretty villages to explore, seaside strolls to enjoy, and local delicacies to devour. 

    And while Snowdonia is famous for its epic mountains – especially Snowdon, Wales’s highest peak – the region has a softer side too, its foothills full of wildflowers and woodlands, and its coast dotted with long sandy beaches. Whether for a wild weekend or an action-packed holiday, here’s how to plan your perfect trip.

    Things to do in Snowdonia

    Conquer a challenging hike up Yr Wyddfa (Snowdon), Wales’ highest mountain, and check out rare wildlife species such as Lili'r Wyddfa (the Snowdon Lily).

    Discover more about Snowdon
    Woman and dog on a paddle-board on lake near mountains
    Yr Wyddfa (Snowdon)

    Find a little slice of the Italian Riviera in this purpose-built village resort and gardens.

    Find out more about Portmeirion
    Revellers at a forest gig at music festival
    Portmeirion

    For adrenaline lovers and the gently curious alike, head to Conwy Valley’s Zip World Fforest.

    Find out more about Zip World Fforest
    NVW-C04-1415-0066
    Zip World Fforest

    Set against the backdrop of North Wales’ Carneddau Mountains, these pioneering Victorian gardens were home to many of Britain’s horticultural firsts.

    Visit Bodnant Garden
    Pink Flowers in Bodnant Gardens
    Bodnant Garden

    Conquer a challenging hike up Yr Wyddfa (Snowdon), Wales’ highest mountain, and check out rare wildlife species such as Lili'r Wyddfa (the Snowdon Lily).

    Discover more about Snowdon
    Woman and dog on a paddle-board on lake near mountains
    Yr Wyddfa (Snowdon)

    Find a little slice of the Italian Riviera in this purpose-built village resort and gardens.

    Find out more about Portmeirion
    Revellers at a forest gig at music festival
    Portmeirion

    For adrenaline lovers and the gently curious alike, head to Conwy Valley’s Zip World Fforest.

    Find out more about Zip World Fforest
    NVW-C04-1415-0066
    Zip World Fforest

    Set against the backdrop of North Wales’ Carneddau Mountains, these pioneering Victorian gardens were home to many of Britain’s horticultural firsts.

    Visit Bodnant Garden
    Pink Flowers in Bodnant Gardens
    Bodnant Garden

    Places to stay in Snowdonia

    Glamping getaways

    For a wild night out, look to Snowdonia’s glamping sites and shepherd’s huts – with options as rustic or luxurious as you like.

    Countryside pubs

    Offering home-cooked food and warm Welsh welcome, the park’s pub hotels are full of local charm.

    Cosy cottages

    Snowdonia’s valleys and woodlands are dotted with traditional stone-built cottages, many of which can be rented.

    Explore nearby

    World-class football and a music scene that brought Oasis to centre stage – there’s lots to love about Manchester.

    Group of friends walking by the canal in Castlefield

    From The Beatles to Frankie Goes to Hollywood, Liverpool is a UNESCO City of Music with seriously cool credentials.

    Rooftop of Oh me oh my restaurant in Liverpool

    A paradise for hikers, swimmers, thrill-seekers and birdwatchers.

    Man surfing al dusk leaving a large spray of water

    Step into a land of castles, world-renowned rugby and a whole host of myths and legends.

    A gay couple enjoying the shopping facilities at Castle Arcade in Cardiff.

    Getting to Snowdonia

    Llandudno Junction can be reached by train from Manchester and Liverpool in around two hours, with onward direct connections to Betws-y-Coed (30 minutes), Blaenau Ffestiniog (one hour) and other key Snowdonia towns. By road, the closest international airports are Liverpool John Lennon (90 minutes), Manchester (one hour 40 minutes) and Birmingham (two hours 30 minutes)

    Getting around

    Hopping on board a train isn’t just convenient: Snowdonia’s rail routes are picturesque too, with the Cambrian and Conwy Valley lines weaving through beautiful scenery. For the easiest access to hiking trails, it’s wise to hire a car – but the local bus services are convenient and well-connected. 

    By train

    Travel back in time on the Ffestiniog and Welsh Highland Railways steam trains, in north-west Snowdonia.

    By bike

    Prefer pedal power? Mountain bikes, road bikes and e-bikes can be rented from venues all over the park. 

    By bus

    For Snowdon hikers, the Snowdon Sherpa offers a hop-on-hop-off service around the base of the mountain.

    Want to know more?

    Head to Snowdonia’s official website to discover all the best things to do and places to stay.