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    Why we love the England Coast Path

    The England Coast Path is a masterpiece in the making. When completed, it will be the world’s longest shore walk, encircling the entire English seaboard: a remarkable 2,795 miles (4,500km) of beaches, clifftops, cities and nature reserves. From the southern tip of Cornwall to the uppermost reaches of Northumberland, it will link world-famous landmarks with little-known corners – a journey through unique cultures, geologies, history and more.

    So far, only a handful of sections are officially open, but many will closely follow other established routes, such as the South West Coast Path. As with all of Britain’s National Trails, it’s up to you how you walk it: maybe you’ll hike its entirety, follow a long-distance route, or dip into shorter day walks?

    Here, we focus on the sections that are now completed and signposted as the England Coast Path. There are walks for all abilities, in all parts of the country – so where will the trail take you?

    Things to do on the England Coast Path

    Take flight on the world’s tallest moving observation tower, with 360-degree views of the city and coast.

    Fly high at the Brighton i360
    Kids looking down from glass pod at city views
    Brighton i360

    Bathe in crystal-clear waters at this beautiful Dorset bay and beach, which is also a Unesco World Heritage site.

    Take a dip at Lulworth Cove
    Person kayaking along the shores of coastline. Rugged cliff
    Lulworth Cove, Dorset

    A true British icon, these dazzling chalk cliffs tower over the English Channel: on clear days, you can see France from the top.

    Visit the White Cliffs of Dover
    Woman pushing bicycle up a country road with white cliffs
    White Cliffs of Dover

    Stretching for 18 miles (29km), this shingle beach is ideal for long walks and sunny picnics, and even has its own nature reserve.

    Plan your trip to Chesil Beach
    Chesil Beach
    Chesil Beach, Dorset

    For charming countryside and a wild coastline, look to England's very first Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

    Head to the Quantock Hills
    Quantock Hills
    Quantock Hills, Somerset

    Take flight on the world’s tallest moving observation tower, with 360-degree views of the city and coast.

    Fly high at the Brighton i360
    Kids looking down from glass pod at city views
    Brighton i360

    Bathe in crystal-clear waters at this beautiful Dorset bay and beach, which is also a Unesco World Heritage site.

    Take a dip at Lulworth Cove
    Person kayaking along the shores of coastline. Rugged cliff
    Lulworth Cove, Dorset

    A true British icon, these dazzling chalk cliffs tower over the English Channel: on clear days, you can see France from the top.

    Visit the White Cliffs of Dover
    Woman pushing bicycle up a country road with white cliffs
    White Cliffs of Dover

    Stretching for 18 miles (29km), this shingle beach is ideal for long walks and sunny picnics, and even has its own nature reserve.

    Plan your trip to Chesil Beach
    Chesil Beach
    Chesil Beach, Dorset

    For charming countryside and a wild coastline, look to England's very first Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

    Head to the Quantock Hills
    Quantock Hills
    Quantock Hills, Somerset

    Places to stay on the England Coast Path

    Brighton

    Right on the stretch between Shoreham-by-Sea and Eastbourne, Brighton is a fun-loving city on the south coast, with a huge choice of quirky B&Bs.

    Amble

    This tiny harbour village is ideal for accessing Northumberland’s section of the England Coast Path, while Bamburgh sits to the north.

    Quantock Hills

    Near the ​​route between Brean Down and Minehead, this region is an official Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, offering farm-stays and campsites.

    Explore nearby

    A quirky seaside city filled with diverse cuisine, vintage shopping and adrenaline fuelled adventure.

    Female yoga class taking place on the viewing platform of British Airways i360 Viewing Tower, Brighton, East Sussex, England

    From The Beatles to Frankie Goes to Hollywood, Liverpool is a UNESCO City of Music with seriously cool credentials.

    Rooftop of Oh me oh my restaurant in Liverpool

    Welcome to dinosaur territory, with beaches and rocks strewn with ancient fossils and footprints.

    People kayaking along the shores of coastline

    Historical hot property – evident in its castles, citadels and 2,000-year-old Hadrian’s Wall.

    View from a distance of a castle on hill near a beach

    Getting to the England Coast Path

    Whether you’re travelling by train, bus or road, England’s coast is simple to reach – and is within an hour’s journey of many major cities, including London. For international arrivals, Gatwick Airport is just a 30-minute drive or train journey from Brighton, while Folkestone and Newcastle (whose sections of the England Coast Path are already open) offer ferry links with France and the Netherlands. 

    Getting around

    The  England Coast Path provides improved access to the country’s shoreline, making it easy for everybody to visit. However, the coast is also home to thriving cities, towns and attractions, so it’s already very simple to navigate. For day walks, why not take the bus to a location on the path, and then hike back to your hotel? Or, hire a bike to explore the nearby countryside trails.

    By foot

    Walk it, of course! Even though the full route isn’t completed, many sections of the England Coast Path are already open – so you can have a preview.

    By train

    From charming steam trains to high-speed networks, England’s coast is well connected by rail. Services usually link up with bus routes, too.

    By bike

    Venture out on two wheels to discover the best sights, beaches and picnic spots. Not all sections of the path are suitable for cyclists though.

    Want to know more?

    To find out how the England Coast Path is progressing, check out the official website.